Rare diamond seized from money launderer set for online auction
This flawless diamond, known as the "Golden Eye," is up for a minimum bid of $900,000.
August 11th, 2011
08:50 PM ET

Rare diamond seized from money launderer set for online auction

A rare 43-carat yellow diamond that belonged to a convicted money launderer will be auctioned for a minimum bid of $900,000, the U.S. Marshals Service said Thursday.

The flawless diamond, known as the "Golden Eye," will be sold in an online auction on September 6 by the U.S. Marshal's Service, the Department of Justice said in a statement Thursday. The FBI seized the notable diamond in an undercover investigation that led to Ohio businessman Paul Monea's conviction for money laundering.

Known for his involvement in the Tae Bo workout craze and a failed effort to market electric grill lighters as pain relievers, Monea was convicted in 2007 of conspiring to sell the diamond and a mansion once owned by former heavyweight boxer Mike Tyson in exchange for $19.5 million and a boat, according to court documents.

There is no clear evidence of how Monea came to possess the diamond, according to court documents. He allegedly told others involved in the case that he owned a diamond mine in Africa and that he received the diamond from a friend.

The diamond was forfeited to the government by a district court judge in 2007, the Department of Justice said. Legal claims delayed the process until March, when the final forfeiture was ordered and the U.S. Marshals Service acquired it.

The U.S. Marshals Service is responsible for selling seized and forfeited properties acquired by federal criminals through illegal activities, the DOJ said. Proceeds from the auction are used to compensate victims, pay for law enforcement initiatives and support community programs, according to the Department of Justice.

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Filed under: Crime
soundoff (115 Responses)
  1. banasy©

    Hey! They found the diamond that was stolen from me!

    August 11, 2011 at 9:17 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Cesar

    I bid $900,001. Sorry banasy, business is business. If I win the bid, I'll let you see it once a year.

    August 11, 2011 at 9:25 pm | Report abuse |
    • Rags

      Cesar
      I bid $900,001. Sorry banasy, business is business. If I win the bid, I'll let you see it once a year.

      For a small fee, of course.

      August 11, 2011 at 9:33 pm | Report abuse |
    • hecep

      I bid 5000 quat-looz.

      August 12, 2011 at 2:37 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Jillybean

    Oh My , What a beauty...I wonder who the lucky bidder will be?

    August 11, 2011 at 9:32 pm | Report abuse |
  4. NoTags

    $900,000 won't be close to the price a 43 carat yellow brings.

    August 11, 2011 at 9:32 pm | Report abuse |
    • jimmymax

      It's worth millions.

      August 11, 2011 at 9:51 pm | Report abuse |
  5. Keith

    I wonder if that's the canary diamond that was stolen from the Witte Museum in San Antonio decades ago.

    August 11, 2011 at 9:35 pm | Report abuse |
  6. Grog

    It's quite lovely, but if I had that kind of coin laying around I'd buy a sweet car with it. Much more fun. Maybe a boat. I wonder what shrunken heads go for nowadays?

    August 11, 2011 at 9:40 pm | Report abuse |
    • jimmymax

      Yours? I wouldn't give much for it, it's already hollow after all.

      August 11, 2011 at 9:52 pm | Report abuse |
  7. Cesar

    Good one fakey, "For a fee..."

    August 11, 2011 at 9:43 pm | Report abuse |
  8. edgewater

    Why not give it to a museum

    August 11, 2011 at 9:54 pm | Report abuse |
    • SquattingDog

      They bigger thief stole it from the smaller thief, and now will sell it to the next one, who'll hide it from the world until the IRS comes collecting. Nothing is really for the public ...keep on walking.

      August 11, 2011 at 9:57 pm | Report abuse |
  9. SquattingDog

    Boy ...what would law enforcement do for a living if everyone was good?

    August 11, 2011 at 9:54 pm | Report abuse |
  10. NoTags

    A Saudi prince, or someone from the UAE or Kuwait will purchase it.

    August 11, 2011 at 9:59 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Steve

    "Proceeds from the auction are used to compensate victims, pay for law enforcement initiatives and support community programs, according to the Department of Justice" Right......
    Fancy electronic surveillance and weapons, bought from friends of the Feds for lots of money. The real thieves have badges!

    August 11, 2011 at 10:04 pm | Report abuse |
  12. Grog

    Sweet I've been trolled.. I have been trolled for a long time, so that's cool. My head is still not as hollow as your balls or soul mr troll.. Hobble off to Dr. Frankenstein now Igor.. "yes mathter"..

    August 11, 2011 at 10:19 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Name*Bucktooth

    Whoa!

    August 11, 2011 at 10:20 pm | Report abuse |
  14. Ben Hutchins

    No word on whether the rest of the satellite weapons control system is included.

    August 11, 2011 at 10:26 pm | Report abuse |
  15. Poleece

    @SquattingDog: I like law enforcement, but it's not their fault our government has revolving door munchausen policies. Crime exists more for the politicians to have a cause that it does for a cop's job security. We agree in general principle though.

    August 11, 2011 at 10:28 pm | Report abuse |
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