Tropical Storm Katia forecast to become major hurricane
Images from NASA GOES satellite shows Katia at the right, just after daybreak on Tuesday.
August 30th, 2011
11:12 PM ET

Tropical Storm Katia forecast to become major hurricane

[Updated at 11:12 p.m. ET] Tropical Storm Katia was strengthening in the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday and could become a hurricane on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said.

In its 11 p.m. ET advisory, the hurricane center said Katia has maximum sustained winds of 60 mph - up from 45 mph 12 hours earlier. The storm was in the open Atlantic about 1,700 miles east-southeast of the Caribbean Sea's Leeward Islands.

Katia was moving west-northwest near 22 mph. That general motion was expected to continue for the next two days, though the forward speed could decrease, the hurricane center said.

Katia could grow into a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph by Saturday evening, perhaps more than 500 miles east of the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico, the hurricane center said. It is too early to predict whether the storm will threaten land.

Category 3 hurricanes have maximum sustained winds of 111 to 130 mph.

Katia is the storm name that replaced Katrina in the revolving list of names, according to the center. The list of Atlantic hurricane names is repeated every seven years, and this year the list that was used in 2005 is being reused.

A storm name is retired if it is used for a hurricane that caused major damage, as Katrina did to the U.S. Gulf Coast in 2005.

"The only time that there is a change is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for obvious reasons of sensitivity," the hurricane center said.

[Updated at 5:42 p.m. ET] Tropical Storm Katia was strengthening in the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday and could become a hurricane on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said.

In its 5 p.m. ET advisory, the hurricane center said Katia has maximum sustained winds of 60 mph - up from 45 mph six hours earlier. The storm was about 750 miles west of the southernmost of the Cape Verde Islands, which are hundreds of miles off the west coast of Africa.

Katia was moving west-northwest near 20 mph.

[Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET] In its 11 a.m. ET advisory, the hurricane center said Katia has maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. The storm was in the open Atlantic about 630 miles west-southwest of the southernmost of the Cape Verde Islands. It was moving west-northwest at 18 mph. That general motion was expected to continue for the next few days.

[Updated at 5:25 a.m. ET] Tropical Storm Katia barreled across the Atlantic Ocean early Tuesday and is expected to intensify and accelerate, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said.

As of 5 a.m. ET, Katia was about 535 miles (855 kilometers) west-southwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands and carried maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph).

soundoff (528 Responses)
  1. Still smarter than you

    Helpful advice. Be sure to keep that in mind when natural selection rids us of your arrogance with a bolt of lightning or a tornado.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:24 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Nancy

    There is not one place on Earth that is free of Natural Disasters. So get off your high horse.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:29 pm | Report abuse |
  3. ha ha

    Yes, you east coaster's living in the earthquake danger zone and not expecting it to happen to you. Wait, that's San Francisco. And it didn't happen here.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:29 pm | Report abuse |
  4. EastCoastMike

    Yep, you're just smarter than everyone else. You just pack up the family into your trailer and move to another town near a WalMart when the weather gets bad. No crazy insurance premiums for you! If only the rest of the country was a smart as you....

    August 30, 2011 at 6:34 pm | Report abuse |
  5. dude

    I get what your saying, everyone your right there is no where on earth safe from natural disasters but there are places were disaters are so common that they are not covered by the news. Just saying might not want to live or keep rebuilding your house in those same ares. Insanity.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:37 pm | Report abuse |
  6. GwT

    "Show me one place on the map that is not prone to natural disasters."

    Well, here in Colorado Springs at the base of Pikes Peak, if you don't count a megavolcano in Wyoming that MIGHT go kaboom in the next 5000 years, we have it pretty good. No floods, no hurricanes, no tornadoes, just the occasional thunderstorm or blizzard. We're not "prone" to any sort of things that other places on the country have to worry about.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:40 pm | Report abuse |
  7. conrad

    great another one..!!!

    August 30, 2011 at 6:42 pm | Report abuse |
  8. conrad

    I'm just wondering what Blenn Beck have to say about Katia another sign from God?:-)

    August 30, 2011 at 6:44 pm | Report abuse |
  9. hawk

    Just what is your problem? i live 200 miles north of beaumont texas and rita still was a catagory 2 storm when it hit us . these storms can and do hit places like kansas and nebraska.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:45 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Marine5484

    Wow....really? Please tell me one spot on the face of the Earth where there is not some sort of natural disaster that can put a human at risk. Oh and CNN you need to update the info here Katia is now a 60mph sustained winds.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:45 pm | Report abuse |
  11. lenny

    @Slartibartfast: Dude grow a grain. There has yet to be any solid evidence of man made global warming. Yes the Earth goes through climate change cycles, always has and always will but we haven't a clue what cycle we're tracking towards now.
    The ocean's temperatures is actually colder now than it was during Roman times or during the 1400s so that would tend to suggest we are actually heading towards a global cooling period not global warming period. Don't let professors do your thinking for you. Most of the hottest days on record were around the dust bowl era before the combustible engine was a mainstay in most people's lives.
    Read don't just blindly follow some one.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:45 pm | Report abuse |
    • George6090

      Lenny,

      I have read a lot about this over the past 15 – 20 years and everything that was predicted is coming true. The studies done on ice samples shows the normal fluctuation of Carbon and the three different types of carbon that are trapped in the snow each year and they then form into ice. The fluctuations up until the last few hundred years fluctuated according to how the earth tilts and rotates. Except now. T\he carbon in the latest samples show a huge increase and can only be traced to fossil fuel burning. No where in the world except here do people not believe.

      August 30, 2011 at 6:59 pm | Report abuse |
    • jweller

      AAAS.org is the worlds largest general scientific society. Do a search on climate change on its site and then take about an hour to read though the articles. You'll see that there is no debate in the scientific community on this.

      Please don't base your info on what your favorite political pundit or cherry picked article. Take some time and do some honest research dang it.

      August 30, 2011 at 7:24 pm | Report abuse |
    • Luigi

      Lenny, got a theory to explain increased lake effect snow since the 1990 in central NY?

      August 30, 2011 at 7:32 pm | Report abuse |
  12. Dan

    Have you kicked a DC meter maid today?

    August 30, 2011 at 6:49 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Hasselhoff

    same path as Irene let's hope this sucker goes out to sea..

    August 30, 2011 at 6:50 pm | Report abuse |
  14. lenny

    @GwT: Really? You've never heard of wild fires? Blizzards can do an awful lot of damage also if they're powerful enough. Yes Colorado's nice I lived in Longmont for several years-beautiful country but it still has a risk of natural disasters. For a real good example think The Big Thompson River it caused a lot of damage and killed many people in the 70's when it flooded. Every place is at risk from something, no exceptions.

    August 30, 2011 at 6:55 pm | Report abuse |
  15. cyg

    I think if it does become a hurricane, everyone should completely ignore the forecasts and warnings, and you know, see what happens. Maybe we'll find more to complain about, but I doubt it.

    August 30, 2011 at 7:04 pm | Report abuse |
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