Tropical Storm Katia forecast to become major hurricane
Images from NASA GOES satellite shows Katia at the right, just after daybreak on Tuesday.
August 30th, 2011
11:12 PM ET

Tropical Storm Katia forecast to become major hurricane

[Updated at 11:12 p.m. ET] Tropical Storm Katia was strengthening in the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday and could become a hurricane on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said.

In its 11 p.m. ET advisory, the hurricane center said Katia has maximum sustained winds of 60 mph - up from 45 mph 12 hours earlier. The storm was in the open Atlantic about 1,700 miles east-southeast of the Caribbean Sea's Leeward Islands.

Katia was moving west-northwest near 22 mph. That general motion was expected to continue for the next two days, though the forward speed could decrease, the hurricane center said.

Katia could grow into a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph by Saturday evening, perhaps more than 500 miles east of the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico, the hurricane center said. It is too early to predict whether the storm will threaten land.

Category 3 hurricanes have maximum sustained winds of 111 to 130 mph.

Katia is the storm name that replaced Katrina in the revolving list of names, according to the center. The list of Atlantic hurricane names is repeated every seven years, and this year the list that was used in 2005 is being reused.

A storm name is retired if it is used for a hurricane that caused major damage, as Katrina did to the U.S. Gulf Coast in 2005.

"The only time that there is a change is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for obvious reasons of sensitivity," the hurricane center said.

[Updated at 5:42 p.m. ET] Tropical Storm Katia was strengthening in the Atlantic Ocean on Tuesday and could become a hurricane on Wednesday, the National Hurricane Center said.

In its 5 p.m. ET advisory, the hurricane center said Katia has maximum sustained winds of 60 mph - up from 45 mph six hours earlier. The storm was about 750 miles west of the southernmost of the Cape Verde Islands, which are hundreds of miles off the west coast of Africa.

Katia was moving west-northwest near 20 mph.

[Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET] In its 11 a.m. ET advisory, the hurricane center said Katia has maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. The storm was in the open Atlantic about 630 miles west-southwest of the southernmost of the Cape Verde Islands. It was moving west-northwest at 18 mph. That general motion was expected to continue for the next few days.

[Updated at 5:25 a.m. ET] Tropical Storm Katia barreled across the Atlantic Ocean early Tuesday and is expected to intensify and accelerate, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said.

As of 5 a.m. ET, Katia was about 535 miles (855 kilometers) west-southwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands and carried maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph).

soundoff (528 Responses)
  1. PhillyPhan

    Katia, stay away from the East Coast.........There's only a few more weeks of good weather for the Jersey Shore.

    August 30, 2011 at 2:07 pm | Report abuse |
  2. john macintyre

    Bring it. Send Perry , Bachmann and the rest of those Tea Bagging head cases to the east coast and plant them in the middle of it

    August 30, 2011 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Brickell Princess

    You know the scammers in Miami, Florida are praying that this storm turns into a major hurricane and strikes them. This might be their only chance this year to scam FEMA and insurance companies out of billions of dollars to support their deplorable lifestyles. Well, disasters are all they have left now that the mortgage/housing industry is bust. Oh, and by low life scammers I also mean Miami-Dade County government who is bound to demand $10 billion dollars from FEMA for Parks & Recreation so that they can line their pockets!

    August 30, 2011 at 2:10 pm | Report abuse |
    • john macintyre

      Right on !!

      August 30, 2011 at 2:14 pm | Report abuse |
  4. Tommy Boy

    Ok....its going to be near Puerto Rico by Sunday. Give it another three days or so to move toward the USA. That means that we'll be hearing the news and weather agencies becoming increasingly frenzied for, what....8, 9 days? More people die each year from weather-related skin cancer than storms but you never hear panic attacks because we have 5 straight days of sunshine predicted for the northeast.

    August 30, 2011 at 2:14 pm | Report abuse |
  5. Gerald Farrow

    All the hype about global warming is just a money making plot. The weather is in charge and does what it wants. It's been that way for many thousands of years and isn't done yet.

    August 30, 2011 at 2:14 pm | Report abuse |
  6. ck1721

    This aretile was right below the one that stated that the National Weather Service is no more accurate in their predictions than they were 20 years ago. That, in addition to that fact they the over-estimated (Or "mis-over-estimated" for you Bush haters out there) the intensity of Irene. I'm happy that they were wrong, and we should always be prepared in the face of coming storms (Luck favors the prepared). All I'm saying is that the Senational News of dangerous storms is crazy talk, especially this far ahead of land fall. Must be a slow news day.

    August 30, 2011 at 2:18 pm | Report abuse |
  7. Amber @ Houston, TX

    BRING IT ON!

    August 30, 2011 at 2:18 pm | Report abuse |
  8. Rasik

    Mandatory evacuation tomorrow for the whole USA

    August 30, 2011 at 2:19 pm | Report abuse |
    • JBYJ

      Rasik why don't you evacuate to someplace the sun don't shine!

      September 4, 2011 at 6:42 am | Report abuse |
  9. Kenny

    FARTS have nothing to do with hurricanes but they do contribute to global warming.

    August 30, 2011 at 2:21 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Jen

    Why are all the destructive hurricanes named after girls? That's so unfair 😦

    August 30, 2011 at 2:21 pm | Report abuse |
    • Rethink

      Andrew. Ike.

      August 30, 2011 at 2:28 pm | Report abuse |
    • Kill The Wabbit

      When do we get hurricane dick ?

      August 30, 2011 at 2:30 pm | Report abuse |
    • blthfc

      Hurricane David was the fourth named tropical cyclone, second hurricane, and first major hurricane of the 1979 Atlantic hurricane season. A Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, David was among the deadliest hurricanes in the latter half of the 20th century, killing over 2,000 people in its path, mostly in the Dominican Republic. As of 2010, it remains the only hurricane to make landfall on the Dominican Republic at Category 5 intensity

      August 30, 2011 at 2:31 pm | Report abuse |
    • Kerovan

      Who causes more problems than girls?

      August 30, 2011 at 2:43 pm | Report abuse |
    • chris

      http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutnames.shtml

      August 30, 2011 at 2:47 pm | Report abuse |
    • Emigdio

      Mitch, Floyd, Stan, Francis is a guys name as well.

      August 30, 2011 at 2:47 pm | Report abuse |
    • ArtInChicago

      C'mon Jen. That's easy. When you first meet them, they are wet and wild. When they leave, they take your house, car and your belongings 🙂

      August 30, 2011 at 2:50 pm | Report abuse |
    • redmonde

      ArtInChicago – LOL... That's cute.

      August 30, 2011 at 2:53 pm | Report abuse |
    • jimDC821

      And blthfc, don't forget Frederic, which came after David in 1979 and did a double-blow on the DR... I lived in the DR from '85 – '87 and when I arrived they were still dealing with the damage caused by these two Male Hurricanes. Frederic also caused extensive damage to the Gulf coast, especially Mobile, Ala...

      August 30, 2011 at 2:55 pm | Report abuse |
    • cecilia

      the would be called himacanes and that does not sound right

      August 30, 2011 at 2:58 pm | Report abuse |
    • DC

      I'll answer your question with another question. Who almost always comes out on the losing end in divorce court, men or women?

      August 30, 2011 at 3:02 pm | Report abuse |
    • wes

      Prior to 1979 all Hurricanes were female names because they are so unpredictable. Then, under pressure from feminine groups of the day, the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin) found their "sensitive" side and included both women and mens names. Six lists are used in rotation. Thus, the 2009 list will be used again in 2015 unless the storm is a CAT 4 or 5 (example: Katrina) and that name is retired as to not hurt anyone's feelings.

      August 30, 2011 at 3:03 pm | Report abuse |
    • crawbar

      Who do you think ruin men's life? Women... 🙂

      August 30, 2011 at 3:18 pm | Report abuse |
    • @ moin

      Suprisingly... woman only come out on topo of 55% of divirce settle ments in North America.

      August 30, 2011 at 3:28 pm | Report abuse |
    • turtle

      Every other year they are named after females and every other they are named after males.

      August 30, 2011 at 3:35 pm | Report abuse |
    • turtle

      Odd years femal even years males. this just happens to be a femal naming year. Next year will be named after males.

      August 30, 2011 at 3:38 pm | Report abuse |
    • JBYJ

      Wabbitt it comes right after hurricane crotch

      September 4, 2011 at 6:44 am | Report abuse |
  11. Alex

    That's not the chaos theory, that's the butterfly effect! #getaclue

    August 30, 2011 at 2:28 pm | Report abuse |
  12. gaudeamus igitur

    That's is so funny! CNN's comments section is a very good therapy for stress. Those people I don't know where they're from and where they got these jokes from.

    August 30, 2011 at 2:32 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Evrgreen

    Well, I do believe that natural disasters are a cleaning system for Mother Earth to prevent overpopulation of any kind (except for the roaches that seem to windstand anything)

    August 30, 2011 at 2:33 pm | Report abuse |
    • Nate

      I was just thinkin the same. Except maybe switch over-population with imbalance.

      August 30, 2011 at 2:48 pm | Report abuse |
    • Chris R

      It's not working too well now is it? A few dozen here or a few thousand there or even a couple hundred thousand doesn't really matter. We have more than 6 billion people on this planet. In order to return to the population level of 1980 we'd need 10,000 Indonesia tsunamis. Since that's unlikely maybe we can just do it ourselves with a big old war. We don't want to wipe out the planet so we'll skip nukes but something like WWII would work right? We'd need at least 50 WWIIs to get back to 4 billion people. There are a lot of us. Mother nature isn't going to do diddly to us with something like a hurricane.

      August 30, 2011 at 3:02 pm | Report abuse |
  14. Geof

    Drink every time someone says "storm of the century."

    August 30, 2011 at 2:36 pm | Report abuse |
  15. Mickey

    David, Hugo, Andrew all nasty huricanes

    August 30, 2011 at 2:41 pm | Report abuse |
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