Tuesday's intriguing people
Ex-Pakistani leader Pervez Musharraf says second-guessing his country's role in the war on terror damages U.S.-Pakistani ties.
May 3rd, 2011
11:18 AM ET

Tuesday's intriguing people

Pervez Musharraf

Pakistan's former president appeared on CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360°" on Monday evening, offering a curious, if not contradictory account of his views on Osama bin Laden's whereabouts in recent years. A key ally in the U.S. war on terror until his ouster in 2008, Musharraf said he’d always known that bin Laden was in either Afghanistan or Pakistan. That remark drew protests from host Anderson Cooper who insisted that Musharraf always denied that his country was harboring the terrorist.

“Anyone who said (bin Laden’s) in Pakistan also didn't have the intelligence (to prove it)," Musharraf said. “(Bin Laden being in Pakistan) was not based on any intelligence. It was guesswork."

Musharraf then blamed intelligence sources for the fact that bin Laden was in an urban area, so close to the Pakistan Military Academy and the capital of Islamabad - not in an Afghan cave, as many had speculated. Second-guessing Pakistan’s cooperation in the war on terror only destroys trust between Pakistan and the U.S., he said.

Musharraf finished the interview by saying that while eliminating bin Laden is a good thing for "peace-loving people," having the U.S. military enter Pakistan doesn’t go “with Pakistan's sensitivities.”

“We cannot indicate in any form that we are willing to compromise on our sovereignty like that,” he said.

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Gotta Watch: Behind the scenes of bin Laden's killing
Top U.S. leaders receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden.
May 3rd, 2011
11:14 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Behind the scenes of bin Laden's killing

The hunt for Osama bin Laden that went on for almost a decade led to a final mission that was completed in a matter of minutes. But how? The mission utilized specialized troops, heavy government coordination and extreme precision. Go behind the scenes of this tactical operation in today's Gotta Watch.

Night of the killing– What really happened the night the U.S. killed Osama bin Laden?  Pentagon correspondent Chris Lawrence takes a close look at the operation that took down one of the world's most elusive and feared terrorist leaders.

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U.S. troops kill Osama bin Laden in Pakistan
Osama Bin Laden, seen in an undated photo, attending a meeting with a Kalashnikov on his lap in an undisclosed place.
May 2nd, 2011
11:11 PM ET

U.S. troops kill Osama bin Laden in Pakistan

Editor's note: We'll be providing you with the latest information, the most interesting and compelling details and angles on Osama bin Laden's death as we get them here on this live blog. For the big picture that tells the story in full, click here. But stay with us for news as it continues to break.

[Updated 10:01 p.m. ET] CNN's Chris Lawrence explains, step by step, the raid that killed Osama bin Laden early Monday at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan:

[cnn-video url="http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/bestoftv/2011/05/02/exp.tsr.lawrence.obl.raid.cnn"%5D

[Updated 9:30 p.m. ET] Addressing a group of congressional leaders at the White House this evening, President Barack Obama said that when Americans learned of Osama bin Laden's death, "I think we experienced the same sense of unity that prevailed on 9/11."

"We were reminded again that there is a pride in what this nation stands for and what we can achieve that runs far deeper than party, far deeper than politics," Obama said. "I want to again recognize the heroes who carried out this incredibly dangerous mission as well as all the military and counterterrorism professionals who made the mission possible.”


THE OPERATION: Attack details | Timeline | In plain sight | The compound Video
THE REACTION: U.S. | World | Middle East  | Healing wounds | Your thoughts
THE
MAN: Bin Laden, over the years | Face of terror | Ideology lives on| His life Video
THE SECURITY ISSUES: What's next for al Qaeda | A deathblow to al Qaeda?
THE POLITICS:
A victory for Obama, U.S. | Re-election impact?
THE ANNOUNCEMENT
: Obama: Justice done | Watch Video | Transcript
THE PAKISTANIS: What did Pakistan know? | Pakistan's role? Video 


[Updated 9:10 p.m. ET] A senior U.S. official says that the woman who has killed during the raid on the compound where Osama bin Laden was found was not a wife of bin Laden, and that she may not have been used as a human shield as previously reported. A wife was there, according to an official, but not killed.

Earlier Monday, John Brennan, assistant to the president for homeland security and counterterrorism, told reporters that it was his understanding that the woman who was killed was one of bin Laden's wives. Other officials had said that the woman who died was used as a human shield in an attempt to protect bin Laden.

[Updated 8:48 p.m. ET] Time magazine contributor Omar Waraich says he spoke to Sohaib Athar, an Abbottabad resident and software engineer who unknowingly reported, on Twitter, details of Monday morning's raid that killed Osama bin Laden. Athar had written on Twitter that, among other things, he was hearing a helicopter hovering above Abbottabad.

"When he found out (the commotion was because of) Osama bin Laden, he said to me it was quite ironic," Waraich told CNN's John King. "He said he had left his native city of Lahore, the second largest city in Pakistan, for the quiet of Abbottabad so he could escape suicide bombings and the sounds of explosions rattling his home and frightening himself and his wife. And he said the ultimate irony was that (in) this quiet place he'd moved to, he had found Osama bin Laden as a neighbor.”

[Updated 8:27 p.m. ET] A Time magazine contributor says people with whom he spoke in Abbottabad - the Pakistani city where Osama bin Laden was found and killed early Monday - seemed surprised at the news that the al Qaeda leader had been there.

"When they found out that it was Osama bin Laden in (the compound), expressions just ranged from varying degrees of incredulity," Time contributor Omar Waraich told CNN's John King.

Waraich said people he spoke to in Abbottabad seemed neither ecstatic nor saddened that United States forces had killed bin Laden.

"In fact, Osama bin Laden seemed a bit of a mystery to them throughout the time that they’ve heard of him. They had heard, they said, that he was in Pakistan, but they didn't imagine where, and certainly if they thought he would be in Pakistan, he would be in the tribal areas, some distance away from them," Waraich said.

[Updated 7:28 p.m. ET] More details about Monday morning's raid that killed Osama bin Laden at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, according to a U.S. official: Four helicopters were involved in the operation, but not all were on the ground.

About two dozen commandos were involved in the operation on the ground, the U.S. official said.

Officials don't know how long bin Laden was at the compound, which was completed in 2005, but they believe it was built especially for him, the U.S. official said. The U.S. intelligence community never saw bin Laden in or around the compound before the raid, according to the official.

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How did bin Laden hide just yards from Pakistan military academy?
A map shows the compound and the city where Osama bin Laden was killed and its location to a Pakistan Military Academy.
May 2nd, 2011
12:35 PM ET

How did bin Laden hide just yards from Pakistan military academy?

The compound where Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces is located a bit more than 1,000 yards from a Pakistan Military Academy, raising some questions about how much information the Pakistan military may have had about his whereabouts.

U.S. Sen. Carl Levin, Senate Armed Services Committee chairman, said during a press conference that the Pakistani army has "a lot of explaining to do."

"I think the Pakistani army and intelligence have a lot of questions to answer, given the location, the length of time and the apparent fact that this facility was actually built for bin Laden and its closeness to the central location of the Pakistani army," Levin said. "So I think the army and the intelligence of Pakistan have plenty of questions that they should be answering and hopefully they are being asked by the Pakistani government."

Abbottabad is home to Pakistan's equivalent of West Point - and the website of the Pakistani military even describes the PMA as "a short distance from Abbottabad" also noting "a fine straight road leads to PMA."

Levin said while he appreciated some of the remarks made by President Asif Ali Zardari, he expected that he would have talks with the military about what they knew.

"I do think that the Pakistani president's statement today was a very reassuring statement when he very specifically said that he thinks it is a great victory and that it's a success and he congratulates us on the success of the operation," he said.

But although Levin said he was "not necessarily suspicious" that Zardari or civilian leadership knew, he added, "I must tell you I hope (Zardari) ... will follow through and ask some very tough questions of his own military and his own intelligence. They have got a lot of explaining to do."

Elite U.S. soldier's perspective: Bin Laden's dead, but 'it's not over'
A U.S. Army soldier rides through the streets of Kandahar, Afghanistan, three months after 9/11.
May 2nd, 2011
12:31 PM ET

Elite U.S. soldier's perspective: Bin Laden's dead, but 'it's not over'

A soldier in a special forces unit based in Georgia told CNN on Monday that while the news of Osama bin Laden’s death is cause for celebration, elite military units have sprung into high alert.

“A lot of guys got their security clearances elevated due to what happened last night,” said Lamont, who didn’t give his last name because of what he said were security reasons. “I lot of people got called back” overseas, he said, adding that his unit already was scheduled for deployment as early as two weeks ago.

The U.S. special forces operation that killed bin Laden took place Sunday at a mansion in Abbottabad, about 30 miles (50 kilometers) from the Pakistani capital, Islamabad.

Lamont, who's been in the service for 17 years, called into Atlanta radio station WVEE-FM (V-103) on Monday morning to voice support for U.S. troops. "I didn't call for the glorification for ourselves," he told CNN. "We don’t do this for the praise, but I wanted to do this for other servicemen."

Lamont said while Americans celebrated the death of bin Laden, it was a time of vigilance for elite military units. “It’s a joyous time, don’t get me wrong, but we also have to look for what’s to come. It's not over."

Referring to the al Qaeda terrorist network, Lamont said, "You've got people who are trying to prove themselves and it’ll come down to, 'We want to avenge his death,' which is something (bin Laden) most definitely taught them."

Anti-terror experts agreed Monday, saying the demise of bin Laden doesn't necessarily reduce the terrorist threat.

"Al Qaeda is weakened. But it doesn't mean that the United States has no challenges," Steven L. Spiegel, director for the Center for Middle East Development at the University of California, Los Angeles, said Monday.

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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • September 11 • Terrorism
Reaction to killing of Osama bin Laden
May 2nd, 2011
10:29 AM ET

Reaction to killing of Osama bin Laden

[Updated at 10:29 a.m. ET] The following is reaction from politicians and others around the world to Sunday night's news that al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was killed in a raid involving the U.S. military on a compound in Abbotabad, Pakistan:

Iran Foreign Ministry:  The Islamic Republic of Iran hopes that the death of Osama bin Laden will put an end to war and the killing of innocent people and restore peace to their region, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency. The IRNA website reports Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said, "The Islamic Republic of Iran believes that foreign countries now have no excuse for military buildup in the region to fight terrorism."

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton: The death of Osama bin Laden sends a message to the Taliban in Afghanistan that "you cannot wait us out. You cannot defeat us. But you can make the choice to abandon al Qaeda" and participate in a peaceful political process. Bin Laden's death comes at a time of "great movements toward freedom and democracy" in the Middle East and elsewhere, she said. "There is no better rebuke to al Qaeda and its heinous ideology," she said. "The fight continues and we will never waiver." Some doubted bin Laden would ever be caught, she said, but "this is America. ... We persevere, and we get the job done."

CIA Director Leon Panetta: Today, we have rid the world of the most infamous terrorist of our time. A US strike team stormed a compound in Abottabad, Pakistan and killed Usama Bin Ladin. Thankfully, no Americans were lost, and every effort was taken to avoid civilian casualties. Nothing will ever compensate for the pain and suffering inflicted by this mass murderer and his henchmen. But just as evil never rests, neither does good. May the fact that Usama Bin Ladin no longer inhabits the earth be a source of comfort for the thousands of families, here in America and around the globe, who mourn the victims of al-Qa'ida's barbarity. Within our Agency family, our thoughts turn to those who died fighting to make this day possible. Our brothers and sisters who gave their lives in the war against al-Qa'ida—from Mike Spann to our heroes at Khowst—are with us, in memory and spirit, at this joyful moment. In all that we do, they are our constant inspiration. My deepest thanks and congratulations go out to the officers of our CounterTerrorism Center and Office of South Asia Analysis for their outstanding expertise, amazing creativity, and excellent tradecraft. I also extend my profound appreciation and absolute respect to the strike team, whose great skill and courage brought our nation this historic triumph. The raid was the culmination of intense and tireless effort on the part of many dedicated Agency officers over many years. Our men and women designed highly complex, innovative, and forward-leaning clandestine operations that led us to Bin Ladin. One operation would yield intelligence that was carefully analyzed and then used to drive further operations. Along with our partners at NGA, NSA, and ODNI, we applied the full range of our capabilities, collecting intelligence through both human and technical means and subjecting it to the most rigorous analysis by our government's leading experts on Bin Ladin and his organization. Persistent hard work produced the results that the American people expect of their intelligence service: We gave President Obama and his team accurate, relevant, timely intelligence—providing the information and insight they needed at key points as this mission developed. I offered my personal thanks to the President for his willingness to make the courageous decision to proceed with the operation. Though Bin Ladin is dead, al-Qa'ida is not. The terrorists almost certainly will attempt to avenge him, and we must—and will—remain vigilant and resolute. But we have struck a heavy blow against the enemy. The only leader they have ever known, whose hateful vision gave rise to their atrocities, is no more. The supposedly uncatchable one has been caught and killed. And we will not rest until every last one of them has been delivered to justice. Remember how you felt in the anxious hours after the attacks of September 11th , and how our Agency vowed to run to ground a vicious foe. Whether you were here at the time or were inspired to serve at CIA in the months and years that followed, take heart in knowing that our Agency is doing its essential job for the American people, and for all humanity. A promise has been kept. And a war will be won. God bless the United States of America.

Mexico Ministry of Foreign Relation: The Government of Mexico reiterates its deep conviction that terrorism is a criminal activity that must be fought decisively by the international community because it represents a serious threat to global peace and stability and causes many innocent lives to be lost. That's why the Government of Mexico recognizes the efforts carried out by the Government of the United States to fight against and capture Osama Bin Laden, the leader of the Al Qaeda terrorist organization. These efforts have resulted in his defeat and death during an operation by U.S. armed forces in Pakistan. This is an act of great significance in the efforts to rid the world of the scourge of terrorism which threatens peace and international security, in particular the one practiced by one of the most cruel and bloody terrorist organizations which has acted against the civilian population and which has caused the loss of many innocent lives, including Mexican citizens in the attacks of September 11th, 2001.

Former Vice President Dick Cheney: "The death of Osama bin Laden at the hands of American forces is a victory for the United States and a tremendous achievement for the military and intelligence professionals who carried out this important mission. Their tireless work since 9/11 has made this achievement possible, and enabled us to capture or kill thousands of al Qaeda terrorists and many of their leaders. I also want to congratulate President Obama and the members of his national security team. At this moment when bin Laden has been brought to justice, we especially remember the sacrifice of the young Americans who've paid the ultimate price in defense of the nation, as well as the nearly 3000 Americans who lost their lives on 9/11. Al Qaeda remains a dangerous enemy. Though bin Laden is dead, the war goes on. We must remain vigilant, especially now, and we must continue to support our men and women in uniform who are fighting on the front lines of this war every day. Today, the message our forces have sent is clear - if you attack the United States, we will find you and bring you to justice."

Indian prime minister Manmohan Singh: "I welcome it as a significant step forward and hope that it will deal a decisive blow to Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups. The international community and Pakistan in particular must work comprehensively to end the activities of all such groups who threaten civilized behavior and kill innocent men, women and children."

Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper: In my nearly 50 years in intelligence, never have I seen a more remarkable example of focused integration, seamless collaboration, and sheer professional magnificence as was demonstrated by the Intelligence Community in the ultimate demise of Osama bin Laden. The careful, diligent work of CIA, NGA, and NSA was simply incredible. It is with great pride and admiration that I offer thanks to all of the dedicated men and women of our community who worked so tirelessly in this achievement. I want to thank the President for his cool, decisive leadership. The Intelligence Community will never waver in our continued commitment to protect our citizens, our friends, and our allies. God bless you all, and God bless the United States of America.

Iraqi government spokesman Ali Al-Dabbagh: The government of Iraq supports international efforts to combat terrorism. The Iraqi government is feeling greatly relieved with the success of U.S. forces over the killing of the leader of al-Qaeda (Osama bin Laden) during a military operation carried out in its efforts to combat terrorism. The crimes committed by al-Qaeda terror organization, that Iraqi people and other peaceful nations have suffered from, represents a major threats to the safety and security of the international community. Iraq stresses its support of any international effort to eradicate the poles of blind extremism and terror elements who terrorized safe communities with their crimes.

Esam El Erian, Muslim Brotherhood official spokesman: We see that Osama's death especially after the revolutions in the region, as a new beginning for a normal relationship with the United States in the Middle East so that the US can finalize the peace treaty and recognize Palestine as an independent nation, allow the return of Palestinians to their land, withdraw of US forces from the region and start a new relation with the Arabs. We would like to put behind us the old image portrayed by the 9/11 attacks which has mixed politics, religion and media.

Statement on Saudi Press Agency: "An official source has expressed the hope of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia that the extermination of the terrorist head of Al Qaeda is a step towards the reinforcing of the international efforts to combat terror and breaking up its cells. And the extinguishing of the misleading school of thought it rests on. "

Former President George W. Bush: "This momentous achievement marks a victory for America, for people who seek peace around the world, and for all those who lost loved ones on September 11, 2001. The fight against terror goes on, but tonight America has sent an unmistakable message: No matter how long it takes, justice will be done."

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton: "I congratulate the president, the National Security team and the members of our armed forces on bringing Osama bin Laden to justice after more than a decade of murderous al Qaeda attacks."

British Prime Minister David Cameron: "The news that Osama bin Laden is dead will bring great relief to people across the world. Osama bin Laden was responsible for the worst terrorist atrocities the world has seen - for 9/11 and for so many attacks, which have cost thousands of lives, many of them British. It is a great success that he has been found and will no longer be able to pursue his campaign of global terror. This is a time to remember all those murdered by Osama bin Laden, and all those who lost loved ones. It is also a time too to thank all those who work round the clock to keep us safe from terrorism. Their work will continue. I congratulate President Obama and those responsible for carrying out this operation."

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Gotta Watch: Hunt for Osama bin Laden
U.S. navy seals killed al Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden in a Pakistani firefight.
May 2nd, 2011
06:14 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Hunt for Osama bin Laden

Nearly a decade after the September 11 terrorist attacks, in a mansion in Abbottabad, Pakistan, Osama bin Laden was killed. In today's Gotta Watch, we track the hunt for bin Laden.
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Filed under: Afghanistan • Al Qaeda • Barack Obama • George W. Bush • Gotta Watch • Military • National security • New York • Osama bin Laden • Pakistan • Security • September 11 • Taliban • Terrorism • War
How U.S. forces killed Osama bin Laden
May 2nd, 2011
01:41 AM ET

How U.S. forces killed Osama bin Laden

The mission that killed one of the world's most notorious terrorist leaders was carried out by U.S. forces with the cooperation of Pakistan, U.S. President Barack Obama said Sunday night.

Osama bin Laden - the longtime leader of al Qaeda - was killed by U.S. forces in a mansion about 100 kilometers, or 62 miles, north of the Pakistani capital of Islamabad along with other family members, a senior U.S. official told CNN.

Members of Pakistan's intelligence service, the ISI, were on site in Abbottabad during the operation, a senior Pakistani intelligence official said.

Bin Laden resisted the assault and was killed in a firefight, senior administration officials said.

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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • Pakistan • September 11 • Terrorism
Osama bin Laden, the face of terror
May 1st, 2011
11:29 PM ET

Osama bin Laden, the face of terror

The most prominent face of terror in America and beyond, Osama Bin Laden, has been killed in Pakistan, U.S. officials said Sunday night.

Bin Laden was the leader of al Qaeda, the terrorist network behind the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States. U.S. officials said that their forces have the body of bin Laden.

The enormity of the destruction - the World Trade Center's towers devastated by two hijacked airplanes, the Pentagon partially destroyed by a third hijacked jetliner, a fourth flight crashed in rural Pennsylvania, and more than 3,000 people killed - gave bin Laden a global presence.

The Saudi-born zealot commanded an organization run like a rogue multinational firm, experts said, with subsidiaries operating secretly in dozens of countries, plotting terror, raising money and recruiting young Muslim men - even boys - from many nations to its training camps in Afghanistan.

He used the fruits of his family's success - a personal fortune estimated in the hundreds of millions of dollars - to help finance al Qaeda in its quest for a new pan-Islamic religious state. How much bin Laden got in the settlement of the family estate is still a matter of contention. Estimates range from tens of millions to hundreds of millions.

Even before September 11, bin Laden was already on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list.

He had been implicated in a series of deadly, high-profile attacks that had grown in their intensity and success during the 1990s.

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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • September 11 • Terrorism
Tuesday's live video events
April 5th, 2011
07:35 AM ET

Tuesday's live video events

There's a bit of a budget battle in Washington as President Obama and Congress look to prevent some kind of a government shutdown.  Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the budget crisis.

Today's programming highlights...

10:00 am ET - 9/11 military trials hearing - Attorney General Eric Holder announced Monday that the suspects in the 9/11 attacks on the United States would be tried in military tribunals and not civilian courts.  A House judiciary subcommittee will discuss the matter and more.

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Budget • Coal mining • District of Columbia • Earthquake • Economy • Japan • Justice • Libya • Mine accidents • Mining • Natural Disasters • On CNN.com today • Politics • September 11 • Terrorism • Tsunami • U.S. • War • West Virginia • World
9/11 suspects will not face civilian trials, officials say
Alleged 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is among the suspects expected to be tried at Gitmo.
April 4th, 2011
12:33 PM ET

9/11 suspects will not face civilian trials, officials say

Attorney General Eric Holder will announce this afternoon that the 9/11 suspects will not face federal civilian trials as the Obama administration wanted, two U.S. officials and a government source confirmed.

They instead will be tried before military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, the officials said.

The suspects include alleged 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Monhammed.

Read CNN's full coverage of Holder's announcement on 9/11 suspects
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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Barack Obama • Politics • September 11 • Terrorism • World
Wednesday's live video events
March 30th, 2011
07:47 AM ET

Wednesday's live video events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the conflict in Libya and the nuclear crisis in Japan.

Today's programming highlights...

10:00 am ET - Nuclear safety hearing - The nuclear crisis in Japan is making some in the United States concerned about nuclear safety in this country.  A Senate appropriations subcommittee discusses that issue today.

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Barack Obama • District of Columbia • Earthquake • Energy • Japan • Libya • Natural Disasters • Nuclear • On CNN.com today • Politics • Security • September 11 • Syria • Terrorism • Tsunami • U.S. • War • World
On the Radar: Libya violence escalates; Muslim radicalization; rare earth elements
Refugees head toward Libya's border with Tunisia on Wednesday.
March 9th, 2011
10:03 AM ET

On the Radar: Libya violence escalates; Muslim radicalization; rare earth elements

Libya - Violence in Moammar Gadhafi's Libya was increasing Wednesday as forces loyal to the strongman unleashed bombs and artillery on makeshift rebel forces in the eastern oil city of Ras Lanuf. The latest fighting followed another defiant speech from Gadhafi that aired Tuesday night on state television, in which he again insisted that youths misled and drugged by al Qaeda were to blame for the fighting.

Peter King - The New York Republican congressman says he is determined to use his powerful post as House Homeland Security Committee chairman to hold a highly controversial hearing on what he has dubbed radicalization of Muslims in the United States. Dana Bash, CNN's senior congressional correspondent, profiles the man who says he thinks every day about the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Rare earth elements - They are the elements which occupy those two orphaned rows at the bottom of the periodic table. They're essential for our cell phones, our computer hard drives, our HDTVs. And they are running short. China, which controls supplies of 97% of these materials, doesn't like sharing them with the West. And the only U.S. mine for rare earth elements went out of production after a radioactive waste accident in the 1990s. CNN's John Sutter looks at what rare earth elements mean to us.

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Filed under: Earth • Libya • Mining • National security • On the Radar • September 11 • Terrorism • World
Monday's intriguing people
Director Michael Moore addresses protesters Saturday at the Wisconsin Capitol in Madison.
March 7th, 2011
11:21 AM ET

Monday's intriguing people

Michael Moore

The filmmaker behind the Oscar-winning documentary "Bowling for Columbine" appeared before union activists in Wisconsin and praised them for "arousing a sleeping giant," the Wisconsin State Journal reported. Moore addressed at least 30,000 protesters, urging them to continue their demonstrations against Gov. Scott Walker's budget proposals. "America is not broke," he told the crowd, according to the Madison newspaper. "The only thing that's broke is the moral compass of the rulers."

FULL POST

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February 27th, 2011
11:56 AM ET

Oscars: Daughter of 911 victim talks about her nominated terrorism documentary

Carie Lemack's mother Judy was killed on American Airlines Flight 11 on September 11.

Lemack, who was in her mid-20s when her mother died, recently spoke with CNN International's Jonathan Mann about "Killing in the Name" an Oscar-nominated documentary she produced about Ashraf al-Khaled, a Jordanian Muslim. Al Qaeda bombed al-Khaled's 2005 wedding in Amman, Jordan, killing the couple's parents along many family members. The film focuses on his journey challenging the ideology of terrorism.

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Filed under: Academy Awards • Al Qaeda • Movies • September 11 • Terrorism
Obama signs 9/11 health bill
January 2nd, 2011
09:15 PM ET

Obama signs 9/11 health bill

President Barack Obama signed the 9/11 health bill into law in Hawaii on Sunday, White House spokesman Bill Burton said.

Obama signed the bill during his Hawaiian vacation, with no signing ceremony held. In a statement issued later, the president said he was "honored" to sign the bill, which pays for health care for responders believed to have been sickened by pollution at the ruins of the World Trade Center in New York.

"We will never forget the selfless courage demonstrated by the firefighters, police officers, and first responders who risked their lives to save others," Obama said. "I believe this is a critical step for those who continue to bear the physical scars of those attacks."

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Barack Obama • New York • September 11
Not such a lame-duck session: What Congress passed, Obama signed in week
December 23rd, 2010
12:59 PM ET

Not such a lame-duck session: What Congress passed, Obama signed in week

So about that lame-duck Congress.

After midterm elections, predictions abounded that the next few months were going to be brutal in the halls of Congress - with fighting between the GOP and Democrats, fillibusters aplenty and all around disagreement, meaning nothing was going to get done - despite a massive agenda for the Obama administration.

But now, shortly before the holidays, in what many might have said in November would only happen if there were a Christmas miracle, key pieces of legislation have been signed into law, practically back-to-back. Some, such as the DREAM Act, failed a procedural vote in the Senate. The bill would have offered a path to citizenship to some illegal immigrants who entered the U.S. as children. President Barack Obama called the defeat his "biggest disappointment."

Still, with everything happening so fast, it was blink, and you missed if legislation passed or failed.

So, we figured we'd help you catch up, take a look at where things stand and perhaps re-dub the group of lawmakers many thought couldn't even sit in the same room together as the not so lame-duck Congress after all.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Budget • Don't Ask Don't Tell • Economy • Food • Jobs • Military • Nuclear • Russia • September 11 • Taxes
December 20th, 2010
03:33 PM ET

Monday's intriguing people

John Devlin

The heavy equipment operator was one of the many first responders who worked in the toxic plume at ground zero after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. With three other workers, he told "Daily Show" host Jon Stewart that he couldn't understand why the Senate wasn't taking up debate on a bill that would provide other responders with health care for ills related to their efforts. And on Monday, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined others demanding that the Senate vote on the measure. "We didn't turn our back on anybody. For us to be here now, nine years later, still fighting just for our health, for our compensation?" asked an incredulous Devlin, who said he has late-stage throat cancer.  The bill has been in legislative limbo since Thursday, when Senate Democrats failed to win a procedural vote to open debate on it.

Shana Greatman Swers

The Washington Post published a beautiful, creatively told story about the 35-year-old consultant's pregnancy and her tragic death from post-birth complications. The material for the story, which chronicles the new mother's  joy, heartache and fear, was taken directly from her Facebook postings. Her husband granted journalist Ian Shapira permission to write the piece. The story is garnering much attention both for its content and for the way it was written.

Martin Gaskell

The University of Texas astronomer is suing the University of Kentucky for not hiring him several years ago. He says Kentucky passed on him because he has evangelical Christian beliefs. Among the evidence he says he will present in his case, scheduled for February 2011, is an e-mail from a university staff member saying she found links to his notes and lectures exploring how the Bible relates to astronomy. Science blogs are buzzing about the case.

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Filed under: New York • Religion • Science • September 11 • Terrorism
November 19th, 2010
02:01 PM ET

NYC, 9/11 first responders finalize settlement

A settlement in New York City will pay out hundreds of millions of dollars to ground zero workers exposed to toxic debris after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, lawyers said Friday.

Plaintiffs narrowly approved the deal after facing a Tuesday night deadline that required 95 percent of some 10,000 people who worked at ground zero to approve the measure, according to Marc Berns, an attorney for the plaintiffs.

The agreement concludes a seven-year fight between the city and first responders, who have said they were not properly outfitted for rescue and cleanup efforts after the 9/11 attacks, leaving them exposed to toxic dust that later prompted respiratory health issues.

FULL STORY

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Filed under: Health • New York • September 11
November 11th, 2010
01:37 PM ET

Thursday's intriguing people

Shyne

You might remember ex-gangsta rapper Shyne from his trial about a decade ago (see the 2001 picture). He was charged in a nightclub shooting involving his mentor, Sean “P. Diddy” Combs, and Jennifer Lopez.

Released last year after serving nine years in prison and deported to his native Belize, Shyne easily could have kicked it in Central America. His dad, after all, is the Belizean prime minister.

Instead, he went to Israel in September to explore Judaism, something he’d been interested in since he was a teen when he started reading the stories of King David and Moses, he told The New York Times. His Ethiopian grandmother may have been Jewish, the paper reported.

“There’s nothing in the Chumash that says I can’t drive a Lamborghini,” he told the newspaper, “nothing in the Halacha about driving the cars I like, about the lifestyle I live.”

In March 2006, while incarcerated in the Clinton Correctional Correctional Facility in Dannemora, New York, Shyne legally changed his name from Jamal Michael Barrow to either Moses Levi, Moses Michael Leviy or Moshe Levy Ben-David, depending on the media outlet reporting the story. He told The Times that he became a practicing Jew under the tutelage of the rabbis in prison.

In a YouTube video, he explained his rationale: “You look at any other science, it all goes back to Judaism. They say Abraham is the father of all religions. So for me, I don’t want to talk to the middleman. I want to talk to HaShem. I want to go straight to the boss.”

So, the rapper who once boasted of “leavin’ piece of your brain on your car” now wants to share Jewish values with youth. He told The Jerusalem Post he will continue focusing his music on urban life, but is omitting the n-word and misogyny from his lyrics.

Def Jam Recordings plans to release his albums, the aptly named “Messiah” and “Gangland,” next year.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Afghanistan • Belize • Courts • Iraq • Israel • Kentucky • Military • Most Intriguing People • New York • September 11 • Showbiz
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