Overheard on CNN.com: Safety belts on school buses? After wreck, readers debate
Readers are debating whether safety belts would be worthwhile for school buses after reading about a fatal wreck.
March 12th, 2012
04:07 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Safety belts on school buses? After wreck, readers debate

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

A school bus wreck killed a young child and the driver Monday in Indianapolis, officials said. Readers commenting on the story debated whether additional safety measures are required.

School bus wreck kills child and driver in Indianapolis

We saw differing views on the need for safety belts on buses. One commenter who said she is a bus driver was in support of them.

SitSandraSit: "As a driver, I see kids jumping around on school buses all the time as it is moving. At times I wish I could do something about it, but there isn't much I can do. It's can be difficult to control just one child, let alone 20. I think there should be cameras and restrictions like seat belts. Maybe a computer on the bus to indicate all kids are strapped in."

However, this reader wasn't so sure.

Planethell12: "Even when I was riding a school bus back in the late '80s and early '90s, our bus had seat belts, and we were forced to wear them when the bus driver would walk up and down the aisle before we departed to make sure of this. However the moment  he sat down was the moment we took ours off. One adult for 50 or so kids (especially when the adult is supposed to be driving and not watching the kids) does not cut it."

One reader said children's small size presents special challenges. FULL POST

Alaskan volcano could erupt, disrupt international air travel
A true-color satellite image of Cleveland Volcano collected by the Worldview-2 sensor on October 7, 2011.
February 1st, 2012
04:30 AM ET

Alaskan volcano could erupt, disrupt international air travel

Officials are monitoring a remote Alaska volcano that could launch an ash cloud, potentially threatening intercontinental flights.

"Eruptive activity" of Cleveland Volcano was detected in satellite data, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

The volcano, also known as Mount Cleveland, is on the Aleutian Islands, southwest of mainland Alaska.

Steve McNutt, a scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, said 90% of air freight from Asia to Europe and North America flies over Alaska air space, and hundreds of flights - including more than 20,000 passengers - fly through Anchorage's air space daily.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Air travel • Alaska • Transportation • Travel • U.S. • Volcano • World
Reports: Concrete balls keeping some off Indonesian train roofs
A train passes through a newly installed iron support with hanging concrete balls in Indonesia last week.
January 23rd, 2012
01:04 PM ET

Reports: Concrete balls keeping some off Indonesian train roofs

Is the threat of getting their heads smashed by a concrete ball enough to prevent people from riding the roofs of Indonesian trains?

Depends on whom you ask.

"From our monitoring so far, the roofs of the trains have been clean (from riders) after the concrete balls were put in place,‚ÄĚ a spokesman for state railway company Kereta Api Indonesia,¬†Mateta Rizalulhaq, told the Jakarta Globe on Monday.

The devices erected over some train tracks are called Goal Bola-bola, or goal balls, as they resemble soccer goals with the grapefruit-sized concrete balls strung from chains. The balls are about 10 centimeters, or 4 inches, in diameter and are painted silver. They a strung in groups of a dozen each over each track. The first ones were deployed Tuesday.

But in a Globe report on Saturday, Eman Sulaiman, chief of the Bekasi city station, near which the first set of concrete balls were strung last week, said some people are still trying to ride, donning motorcycle helmets for protection.

Passengers are climbing onto roofs after trains pass the obstacles, according to a report Friday in the Jakarta Post.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Indonesia • Railroads • Transportation • World
January 18th, 2012
07:16 AM ET

Indonesian railway stringing concrete balls to deter roof riders

Indonesia's state railway, Kereta Api Indonesia, has begun stringing concrete balls over rail lines to prevent people from hitching free rides on top of its trains, according to local news reports.

The devices are called Goal Bola-bola , or goal balls, as they resemble soccer goals with the grapefruit-sized concrete balls strung from chains, according to a report in the Jakarta Post.

Trains in Indonesia are often overcrowded.

The railway said it resorted to using the concrete balls after previous anti-roof-rider efforts - including greasing the roofs, spraying roof riders with colored water, and detentions and fines - didn't stop the practice.

But a human rights group says the balls expose violators to a punishment as severe as death for a minor infraction.

‚ÄúPicture this: If a student has to take the train, he or she would face the threat of being killed by the concrete balls. Now his right to get to school safely is simply violated,‚Ä̬†Yosep Adi Prasetyo, a spokesman for the National Commission on Human Rights, told the Jakarta Globe.

The balls will only be used on lines that run locomotives, according to the Globe report. Lines with electric trains will use swinging doors that will allow the electrical connectors through, but not roof riders.

Adi told the Globe the real problem isn't freeloading riders, but that there aren't enough trains to accommodate demand.

Post by:
Filed under: Indonesia • Railroads • Transportation • World
Overheard on CNN.com: Can distracted drivers be stopped?
The new NTSB recommendation would outlaw non-emergency phone calls and texting by operators of every vehicle.
December 13th, 2011
03:16 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Can distracted drivers be stopped?

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

"I have never seen CNN comments in such agreement. This must be a good idea."
–mightyfudge

Driver behavior never fails to get people talking, especially when it involves mobile devices. One of the most popular CNN iReport stories ever was a comedic exploration of  "hands-free" driving. (Watch it, it's good.) Now, a serious comment discussion is taking place because the National Transportation Safety Board has called for a nationwide ban on the use of cell phones and text messaging devices while driving.

NTSB recommends full ban on use of cell phones while driving

Readers were largely in support of this measure. But some commenters said such bans are hard to enforce, while others were concerned that personal freedoms were being impinged upon. Some of the most compelling anecdotes were stories of accidents caused by distracted drivers.

2graddegrees: "It is needed as people do not seem to use common sense for their own safety and the safety of others. Nothing is that necessary by the majority to send or receive. One mistake costs lives or the life one had hoped for. Having lived through a highway speed head on wreck as a passenger, nothing is worth the pain, continuing disability, loss of ability to work in profession studied for, lack of independence and self sufficiency. Common tasks such as driving, reading, walking, writing we're taken from me through no fault of my own (passenger) due to another driver's lack of common sense and consideration for himself and others."

FULL POST

Gotta Watch: Craziness on the highway
Several supercars were involved in a 14-vehicle pile up along a stretch of the Chugoku highway in western Japan.
December 5th, 2011
11:39 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Craziness on the highway

In what may be one of the most expensive car wrecks in history, 14 high-end luxury cars were demolished in a highway pileup in Japan this weekend. The totaled supercars included eight Ferraris, three Mercedes-Benz cars and a Lamborghini. Today, we decided to take a look back at some of the craziest highway moments.

Multi-million dollar wreck –¬†A group of luxury car enthusiasts were driving on Chugoku Expressway in southwestern Japan when witnesses say one driver skidded out of control and started a chain-reaction crash. Several drivers were hospitalized but no one was seriously injured.
[cnn-video url=http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2011/12/05/vo-japan-luxury-car-pile-up.cnn]

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Animals • Auto racing • Automobiles • Georgia • Gotta Watch • Japan • Michigan • Pennsylvania • Race • Thanksgiving • Transportation • Travel • U.S. • Uncategorized
October 6th, 2011
09:21 AM ET

Bus accident injures 33

Thirty-three people were injured - two critically - in a bus accident Thursday morning near Gibbon, Nebraska, the American Bus Association reported.

The driver of the bus was among those critically injured.

Details of the accident were unclear, but it appeared that the bus either struck or was struck by an 18-wheeler, association spokesman Dan Ronan told CNN.

The incident happened on Interstate 80.

The Burlington Trailways bus was heading from Omaha, Nebraska, to Denver, Colorado.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Nebraska • Transportation
newer posts »