September 28th, 2012
11:10 AM ET

Stay of execution issued for convicted killer

A Philadelphia judge ruled Friday to stay the execution of Pennsylvania convicted killer Terrance Williams and grant a new penalty phase in the case.

Williams, 46, was scheduled to be executed on October 3. No one disputes that Williams beat Amos Norwood to death with a tire iron in 1984 or that he should be in prison.

But his defense team says information that Norwood had allegedly sexually abused Williams was withheld from the trial, and his life should be spent in a cell.

Philadelphia Judge M. Teresa Sarmina on Friday found "reasonable probability" that the verdict might have been different had allegations of abuse surfaced during the initial case and that the relationship between the two men had been established but not disclosed.

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Filed under: Courts • Crime • Death Penalty • Justice • Pennsylvania
Police: Hostage standoff ends peacefully in Pittsburgh
September 21st, 2012
01:59 PM ET

Police: Hostage standoff ends peacefully in Pittsburgh

[Updated at 1:59 p.m.] The man suspected of taking a hostage in Pittsburgh's Gateway Center high-rise Friday morning has surrendered peacefully, and his hostage was not harmed, Pittsburgh Police Chief Nathan Harper said.

[Updated at 1:20 p.m.]Police are negotiating with a "relatively calm" gunman believed to be holding at least one person hostage in a downtown Pittsburgh high-rise, the city's police chief said Friday.

Police have identified the man, a former military member with a criminal record, and they brought his mother to the scene, Chief Nathan Harper said.

The suspect walked into CW Breitsman Associates' office Friday morning and asked for a particular man, so police believe a male hostage was targeted, Harper said. CW Breitsman handles money for pension funds. The chief said the gunman never worked there, and it's unclear how he was related to the company.

The situation is contained to one room of a suite on the 16th floor of Gateway Center Building No. 3, Harper said. As of 10:55 a.m., no one had been hurt and no shots had been fired, he added.

Police received calls shortly after 8:15 a.m., reporting a man with a gun. Some witnesses reported he was carrying two duffel bags. Harper said the suspect also claimed to have a bomb.

Several people who work in the building told local television stations that police had evacuated them from the building. Harper said since the incident was contained to one room, evacuations were minimal, and people were still occupying other parts of the skyscraper.

Jim Garra, who works at AXA on the 16th floor, told WTAE that when he arrived at work around 8:10 a.m., security officers were milling about. When he took the elevator to his office, he found a commotion, including a woman he described as "hysterical, on the phone," describing an intruder in the building. Garra said he locked the door to his office until police came to evacuate it.

Public transportation has been shut down at Gateway Center, and police have blocked off nearby roads as well.

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August 31st, 2012
10:19 PM ET

Penn State scandal: Where things stand

The Penn State football team started its first season since former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky was found guilty of sexually abusing 10 boys over 15 years.

The Nittany Lions' home game against Ohio University also will be the first time since 1966 that the team starts a season without Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno, who died in January, two months after the board of trustees fired him for allegedly failing to take his knowledge of the scandal to appropriate authorities.

Though Sandusky was convicted in June, many parts of the Sandusky matter have not been resolved. Here is where things stand in the scandal:

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NCAA Penn State sanctions: Who pays the price?
Readers react to the NCAA sanctions levied against Penn State University, including stripping wins from coach Joe Paterno.
July 23rd, 2012
02:47 PM ET

NCAA Penn State sanctions: Who pays the price?

The sex abuse scandal that rocked the Penn State University community and football fans across the nation culminated Monday in an unprecedented fine of $60 million levied against the school and severe sanctions for the Division I football program.

NCAA gives Penn State 'stark wake-up call'

The Nittany Lions are banned from the postseason for four years and will lose 20 football scholarships a year for four seasons, NCAA President Mark Emmert said. The NCAA also took away 14 seasons of football victories from the late coach Joe Paterno.

Money raised from fines will be used to start a charity supporting programs that serve the victims of child sexual abuse, Emmert said.

Penn State has accepted the NCAA's decision, and university President Rodney Erickson said it will not appeal.

But CNN.com readers had much to say on the penalties incurred and whether or not justice is being served. You can join the conversation on Facebook, CNN.com or CNN iReport. Here are what some had to say:

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Big Ten adds to NCAA sanctions
Students at Penn State react to the NCAA announcement of sanctions against their school's football program.
July 23rd, 2012
11:53 AM ET

Big Ten adds to NCAA sanctions

Editor's note: The National Collegiate Athletic Association announced a $60 million fine against Penn State University on Monday and banned its football team from the postseason for four years. The school will also forfeit all football wins from 1998, NCAA President Mark Emmert said. That decision strips the late Joe Paterno of the title of winningest coach in major football college history.

[Updated 10:53 am ET] The Big Ten conference added its own sanctions against member Penn State after the NCAA announced its penalties on Monday.

Penn State will not be allowed to participate in the Big Ten conference title game for the same four years in which it is banned from post season bowl games by the NCAA. Penn State will also not be allowed to share in the conference's bowl revenues for those four years, about a $13 million hit, according to a Big Ten press release. That money will be donated to children's charities, the release said.

[Updated 10:36 am ET] The NCAA sanctions against Penn State include the following restrictions on scholarships it can offer:

"Penn State must also reduce 10 initial and 20 total scholarships each year for a four-year period."

That means the football program can only offer the equivalent of 15 full scholarships to incoming freshmen or transfer students per year for four years beginning with the 2013-14 academic year and can only offer 65 full scholarships total each year beginning with the 2014-15 academic year. Scholarships may be divided among players as partial scholarships.

Former Penn State player Derek Moye says the vacating of victories ordered by the NCAA can't erase his memories of what he has been a part of:

Former Penn State player A. Q. Shiplet tweets a picture of rings he won at Penn State:

[Updated 10:20 am ET] Former Penn State quarterback Daryll Clark tweets on his reaction to the NCAA sanctions:

[Updated 10:03 am ET] A statement from current Penn State head football coach Bill O'Brien on the NCAA sanctions:

"Today we receive a very harsh penalty from the NCAA and as Head Coach of the Nittany Lions football program, I will do everything in my power to not only comply, but help guide the University forward to become a national leader in ethics, compliance and operational excellence. I knew when I accepted the position that there would be tough times ahead.  But I am committed for the long term to Penn State and our student athletes.

I was then and I remain convinced that our student athletes are the best in the country.  I could not be more proud to lead this team and these courageous and humble young men into the upcoming 2012 season. Together we are committed to building a better athletic program and university."

Do you think the NCAA penalties against Penn State were fair? Share your view with CNN iReport.

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July 18th, 2012
12:40 PM ET

Penn State: Paterno statue decision due in days

A decision will be made on the future status of the embattled statue of former head football coach Joe Paterno "within seven to 10 days," Penn State spokesman David La Torre told CNN on Wednesday.

A small plane flew around the Penn State campus on Tuesday carrying a banner that read, "Take the Statue Down or We Will," a reference to the statue of Paterno outside Beaver Stadium.

The statue is among many vestiges left from Paterno's 46 years as head coach of the Nittany Lions, a run that ended in disgrace in November when he was fired in the wake of a sex abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

"I'm a Penn State employee that thinks we have failed miserably, and I'm sad for the damage that has been done, but this is just upsetting," Diane Farley, a PSU alumnus who spotted the plane on Tuesday told the Patriot-News of Harrisburg. "It's just stirring up everything."

Many people are calling for the Paterno statue to be torn down.

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July 17th, 2012
05:02 PM ET

NCAA not ruling out tough sanctions on Penn State football

It's still not clear what the future holds for Nittany Lions football after a child sex abuse scandal implicated top Penn State officials and placed a former assistant coach behind bars.
That was the message from National Collegiate Athletic Association President Mark Emmert, who spoke with PBS in his first public comment on the matter during an interview broadcast Monday. 
Emmert said he doesn't want to "take anything off the table" regarding NCAA-imposed penalties, adding that he'd "never seen anything as egregious as this in terms of just overall conduct and behavior inside a university."
"What the appropriate penalties are, if there are determinations of violations, we'll have to decide," he said.

FULL STORY
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Airborne banner: Take down Paterno statue
A plane carries a banner reading "Take the Statue Down or We Will" above the Penn State campus on Tuesday.
July 17th, 2012
12:21 PM ET

Airborne banner: Take down Paterno statue

A small plane flew around the Penn State campus on Tuesday carrying a banner that read, "Take the Statue Down or We Will," a reference to the statue of former head football coach Joe Paterno that sits outside Beaver Stadium.

The statue is among many vestiges left from Paterno's 46 years as head coach of the Nittany Lions, a run that ended in disgrace in November when he was fired in the wake of a sex abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

"I'm a Penn State employee that thinks we have failed miserably, and I'm sad for the damage that has been done, but this is just upsetting," Diane Farley, a PSU alumnus who spotted the plane on Tuesday told the Patriot-News of Harrisburg. "It's just stirring up everything."

Many people are calling for the Paterno statue to be torn down.

In an ESPN poll, more than 60% of respondents said the statue should be removed immediately or sometime before the 2012 football season commences.

A Penn State student group eliminated another Paterno vestige on Monday, renaming the encampment where students line up overnight to get the best seats for football games, from Paternoville to Nittanyville.

The action comes after a report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh last week that found that several school officials had "empowered" Sandusky to continue sexually abusing minors. Paterno could have stopped the attacks had he done more, Freeh concluded.

Sandusky was convicted last month of sexually abusing children over 15 years, with much of the abuse occurring on the Penn State campus. He is awaiting sentencing.

Paterno died of lung cancer in January at the age of 85, two months after he was fired because of the Sandusky scandal.

In his 46 years as head coach at Penn State, Paterno achieved mythic status. But with the release of the Freeh report, many no longer want the symbols of that status, including the name of the encampment, to have such prominence in the university community.

"Now, it's a new era of Nittany Lion football," Troy Weller, a Penn State senior and president of the newly retitled Nittanyville Coordination Committee, said in a statement Monday. "And by changing the name to Nittanyville we want to return the focus to the overall team and the thousands of students who support it."

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Report: Three men claim they were abused by Sandusky in '70s, '80s
Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves court after being convicted in his child rape trial.
July 16th, 2012
12:28 PM ET

Report: Three men claim they were abused by Sandusky in '70s, '80s

Police are aware of three men who say they were abused in the 1970s or 1980s by former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky, CNN contributor Sara Ganim reports for the Harrisburg Patriot News.

The allegations are the first to involve claims of abuse by the coach before the 1990s. During Sandusky's child rape trial, his defense argued that it is rare for someone to suddenly become a pedophile in their later years.

After a three-week trial featuring emotional and often graphic testimony from eight of the former Penn State assistant football coach's victims, a 12-person jury late Friday night convicted him on 45 of 48 counts. There were convictions related to all 10 victims alleged by prosecutors, with the three not-guilty verdicts applying to three individuals.

The verdict prompted people in central Pennsylvania to breathe a sigh of relief, believing a man many called a "monster" would pay the price for his crimes and their impact on his victims, as well as the Penn State community.

As the jury was deliberating, more accusers - including his own adopted son - were speaking publicly for the first time about alleged abuse.

More on Penn State scandal:

The woman who stood up to Paterno

Reactions to Penn State report flood social media

Review recasts story of gridiron hero

FULL STORY
Clery Act at center of Penn State probe, 26 years after young woman's murder
Ex-FBI Director Louis Freeh presented a report citing a "lack of awareness" about the Clery Act by Penn State officials.
July 12th, 2012
01:21 PM ET

Clery Act at center of Penn State probe, 26 years after young woman's murder

In 1986, Jeanne Clery, a 19-year-old freshman at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, was found dead in her third-floor dorm room. She had been sodomized, tortured, and then strangled with the uncoiled metal of a toy resembling a Slinky, according to media reports.

Clery's parents had sent her to Lehigh because they thought she'd be safe. She'd also been accepted at Tulane University in New Orleans, but after learning a student there had been murdered off campus, the couple began looking for a safer place to send their daughter for college.

It was only after Clery's murder that her parents learned Lehigh had seen 38 violent offenses - rape, robbery and assault among them - in a three-year period, according to a 1990 feature in People magazine.

Constance and Howard Clery later settled with the university for an undisclosed amount and began working to ensure campus crime was a more transparent issue in the future. They opened the Clery Center for Security on Campus and pushed for the 1990 legislation requiring public disclosure of crimes on American campuses.

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, or Clery Act, is now at the center of the investigation into what Penn State University officials did or didn't do after hearing allegations that assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky was molesting boys.

In a scathing internal review that blasts the upper echelons of the school's administration, investigators cited several failures to disclose information to police by a university leadership that the report said was more concerned about bad publicity than the sex-crime victims who had been molested on campus.

The review also reported "a lack of awareness of child abuse issues, the Clery Act, and whistle-blower policies and protections."

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July 12th, 2012
11:48 AM ET

Paterno family's statement on Freeh report

The following is a statement from the family of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, following Thursday's release of an internal report criticizing Penn State's handling of child sexual abuse allegations against former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky:

"We are in the process of reviewing the Freeh report and will need some time before we can comment in depth on its findings and conclusions. From the moment this crisis broke, Joe Paterno supported a comprehensive, fair investigation. He always believed, as we do, that the full truth should be uncovered.

"From what we have been able to assess at this time, it appears that after reviewing 3 million documents and conducting more than 400 interviews, the underlying facts as summarized in the report are almost entirely consistent with what we understood them to be. The 1998 incident was reported to law enforcement and investigated. Joe Paterno reported what he was told about the 2001 incident to Penn State authorities and he believed it would be fully investigated. The investigation also confirmed that Sandusky's retirement in 1999 was unrelated to these events.

"One great risk in this situation is a replaying of events from the last 15 years or so in a way that makes it look obvious what everyone must have known and should have done. The idea that any sane, responsible adult would knowingly cover up for a child predator is impossible to accept. The far more realistic conclusion is that many people didn't fully understand what was happening and underestimated or misinterpreted events. Sandusky was a great deceiver. He fooled everyone – law enforcement, his family, coaches, players, neighbors, University officials, and everyone at Second Mile.

"Joe Paterno wasn't perfect. He made mistakes and he regretted them. He is still the only leader to step forward and say that with the benefit of hindsight he wished he had done more. To think, however, that he would have protected Jerry Sandusky to avoid bad publicity is simply not realistic. If Joe Paterno had understood what Sandusky was, a fear of bad publicity would not have factored into his actions.

"We appreciate the effort that was put into this investigation. The issue we have with some of the conclusions is that they represent a judgment on motives and intentions and we think this is impossible. We have said from the beginning that Joe Paterno did not know Jerry Sandusky was a child predator. Moreover, Joe Paterno never interfered with any investigation. He immediately and accurately reported the incident he was told about in 2001.

"It can be argued that Joe Paterno should have gone further. He should have pushed his superiors to see that they were doing their jobs. We accept this criticism. At the same time, Joe Paterno and everyone else knew that Sandusky had been repeatedly investigated by authorities who approved his multiple adoptions and foster children. Joe Paterno mistakenly believed that investigators, law enforcement officials, University leaders and others would properly and fully investigate any issue and proceed as the facts dictated.

"This didn't happen and everyone shares the responsibility."

More on this story:

Penn State leaders showed 'total disregard' for victims, review finds

Key players in Penn State report

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July 12th, 2012
08:59 AM ET

PSU officials concealed Sandusky's activities, probe says

An internal probe into the Penn State child sex abuse scandal found that top university officials, including former president Graham Spanier and then-head football coach Joe Paterno, concealed evidence of abuse by ex-assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

An effort to avoid bad publicity "is the most significant, but not the only, cause for this failure to protect child victims and report to authorities," the investigation found.

Spanier and Paterno, as well as former university vice president Gary Schultz and ex-athletic director Tim Curley, participated in "an active decision to conceal" allegations against Sandusky, the probe's leader told reporters Thursday. Additionally, the report says the officials failed to inquire about the victims' well-being, even failing to try to identify a boy who allegedly was sexually assaulted in a Penn State shower in 2001.

Also, Penn State officials were poised to report that February 2001 sex abuse allegation, but they "changed the plan and decided not to make a report to the authorities" after Curley consulted with Paterno, the head of the probe, former FBI Director Louis Freeh, told reporters.

Full CNN report: Penn State leaders showed 'total disregard' for victims, review finds

The full Freeh report

Clery Act at center of Penn State probe, 26 years after teen's murder

Key players in Penn State report

Share your thoughts with CNN iReport.

The 267-page findings of the Penn State-funded internal review were released Thursday morning. The report focuses on what school officials knew about Sandusky's behavior. The scandal led some people to claim the school put its reputation ahead of protecting potential child victims.

A jury last month convicted Sandusky, 68, the Nittany Lions' former defensive coordinator, on multiple charges of sexually abusing 10 boys over a period of 15 years.

Here is a running log of the Thursday's developments:

[Updated at 1:57 p.m. ET] Around the time that Nike was announcing that it was changing the name of the Joe Paterno Child Development Center on Nike's campus in Beaverton, Oregon (see 1:46 p.m. entry), Nike co-founder and chairman Phil Knight released this statement:

“Other than my parents, my college coach, Bill Bowerman, was the biggest influence in my life. Bill Bowerman and Joe Paterno shared some great qualities. Throughout Joe Paterno’s career, he strived to put young athletes in a position to succeed and win in sport but most importantly in life. Joe influenced thousands of young men to become better leaders, fathers and husbands.

"According to the investigation, it appears Joe made missteps that led to heartbreaking consequences. I missed that Joe missed it, and I am extremely saddened on this day. My love for Joe and his family remains.‚ÄĚ

‚Äď Phil Knight, Co-Founder and Chairman of the Board, NIKE, Inc.

[Updated at 1:46 p.m. ET] The president of Nike Inc. has announced that the firm is changing the name of the Joe Paterno Child Development Center, a child care center at the Nike headquarters near Beaverton, Oregon, in the light of the Freeh report.

"I have been deeply saddened by the news coming out of this investigation at Penn State," Mark Parker said.

[Updated at 11:52 a.m. ET] As promised, here is the link to the Paterno family's full statement.

[Updated at 11:38 a.m. ET] Another key point from the Paterno family statement: "We have said from the beginning that Joe Paterno did not know Jerry Sandusky was a child predator. Moreover, Joe Paterno never interfered with any investigation. He immediately and accurately reported the incident he was told about in 2001."

A link to the full statement is coming.

[Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET] Paterno's relatives say that although they will need some time to read the report before they can comment in depth, they accept the criticism that Paterno could have done more, but "at the same time, Joe Paterno and everyone else knew that Sandusky had been repeatedly investigated by authorities who approved his multiple adoptions and foster children."

"Joe Paterno mistakenly believed that investigators, law enforcement officials, University leaders and others would properly and fully investigate any issue and proceed as the facts dictated," Paterno's family said in a statement.

The statement adds: "Joe Paterno wasn't perfect. He made mistakes and he regretted them. He is still the only leader to step forward and say that with the benefit of hindsight he wished he had done more. To think, however, that he would have protected Jerry Sandusky to avoid bad publicity is simply not realistic. If Joe Paterno had understood what Sandusky was, a fear of bad publicity would not have factored into his actions."

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June 25th, 2012
05:31 AM ET

Convicted priest's lawyers to seek house arrest for him

Attorneys for Monsignor William Lynn will return to court Monday to argue that the cleric, who was convicted of child endangerment, be put under house arrest rather than jailed until his sentencing in August.

Lynn was found guilty Friday of one count of child endangerment, the first time a U.S. church leader has been convicted of such a charge.

He was found not guilty on a second count of endangerment and on a charge of conspiring to protect a priest accused of abuse.

The jury was unable to bring a verdict against his co-defendant, the Rev. James Brennan, who was charged with the attempted rape of a 14-year-old altar boy and endangering the welfare of a child.

Lynn was taken into custody after the verdict Friday, when the judge revoked his bail. His lawyer, Jeffrey Lindy, criticized the decision not to let his client remain free on bond prior to sentencing, calling it "an unspeakable miscarriage of justice (for) a 61-year-old man with no prior record and long established ties to the community."

He is set to be sentenced August 13, court officials said, and could face up to seven years in prison for his conviction on a third-degree felony.

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Adopted son says Jerry Sandusky molested him
June 21st, 2012
05:20 PM ET

Adopted son says Jerry Sandusky molested him

Matt Sandusky, one of Jerry Sandusky's adopted children, has said that he was molested by the former Penn State defensive coordinator, according to a statement from his lawyers.

The allegation comes as Sandusky is awaiting the verdict in his child rape trial. Matt Sandusky, who has defended his father as he faced child rape charges, said through his attorneys Andrew Shubin and Justine Andronici that he met with prosecutors this week to tell them he was a victim for the first time.

"During the trial, Matt Sandusky contacted us and requested our advice and assistance in arranging a meeting with prosecutors to disclose for the first time in this case that he is a victim of Jerry Sandusky’s abuse," Matt Sandusky's lawyers said in a statement obtained by InSession. "At Matt’s request, we immediately arranged a meeting between him and the prosecutors and investigators."

No further details were released about the circumstances surrounding the alleged molestation or when Matt Sandusky claims the abuse occurred.

"This has been an extremely painful experience for Matt and he has asked us to convey his request that the media respect his privacy," a statement from Matt Sandusky's lawyer said. "There will be no further comment at this time."

Sandusky is currently facing accusations of sexual abuse from 10 alleged victims. Sandusky, 68, has pleaded not guilty to charges of child sex abuse over a 15-year period. He faces 48 counts in the trial.

All you need to know about allegations, how case unraveled

Sandusky defense: A 'smoking gun' and David fighting Goliath

'The Sandusky 8' describe seduction, molestation and betrayal

During closing arguments, defense attorney Joe Amendola sought to poke holes in the prosecution's case, pointing to inconsistencies with the testimony of Mike McQueary, a former graduate student and assistant coach who said he saw Sandusky apparently sodomizing a boy in a university shower.

He also reminded jurors of the lack of physical evidence and accused the alleged victims of conspiring for financial gain while blaming the media for what he described as biased coverage.

Lead prosecutor Joseph McGettigan followed Amendola, rebuffing the defense's account of a coordinated action among Sandusky's accusers allegedly bent on financial gain.

"The great thing about conspiracy theories is you just let them go on and on, until they collapse under their own weight," he said.

McGettigan described the former coach as a pedophile who systematically preyed on his victims with a calculated and repeated approach.

"The Commonwealth has overwhelming evidence against Mr. Sandusky," he said.

Opinion: Do pedophiles deserve sympathy?

June 20th, 2012
01:44 PM ET

Report: Jury deadlocked on 4 counts in Pa. priest sex abuse case

The jury in a Philadelphia priest sex abuse case told a judge Wednesday that they are unable to reach a verdict on four of the five charges, CNN affiliate KYW reports.

In a note to Judge Teresa Sarmina, the panel said that it has developed "firm, fixed opinions" and "entrenched positions" among its members, making it unable to return verdicts, according to KYW.

The judge said she will offer the jurors some additional or clarifying remarks if they would find that helpful, according to KYW.

Monsignor William Lynn is considered the first high-ranking church official to be charged in the three-month-long trial.

Lynn is accused of knowingly allowing dangerous priests to continue in the ministry in roles in which they had access to children. Also on trial is the Rev. James Brennan, who is accused of the attempted rape of a 14-year-old. Both Brennan and Lynn have pleaded not guilty.

FULL STORY
June 20th, 2012
01:13 PM ET

Sandusky defense rests without ex-coach's testimony

Closing arguments are set for Thursday morning in the child-rape trial of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky after his defense rested its case without calling Sandusky to the witness stand.

Sandusky is accused of sexually abusing 10 boys over a 15-year period. Defense attorney Joe Amendola had told reporters earlier to "stay tuned" to see whether the onetime Penn State defensive coordinator would testify - a move that could have given prosecutors an opening to introduce new evidence against the former coach.

Over four days, several prosecution witnesses testified that Sandusky forced them to engage in sexual acts with him in various places, including showers in the Penn State coaches' locker room, hotel rooms and the basement of his home. One told jurors that Sandusky - whom he met, like many of the accusers, through a charity for disadvantaged youths that the ex-coach founded - had threatened him if he told others about the abuse.

But Sandusky’s wife Dottie testified Tuesday that she could remember at least six of her husband's accusers staying overnight at their house, and said she did not witness any sexual abuse. And former Penn State coach Richard Anderson said it was not uncommon for coaches and youths to use the shower at the same time, and that he had never seen anything inappropriate between Sandusky and a child.

FULL STORY
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June 19th, 2012
02:14 PM ET

What Sandusky has said about child rape allegations

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky - on trial this week on child rape allegations - has made many public comments about the case, including that while he may have "horsed around" with boys, he's innocent of the charges.

The comments came in the months before the trial - including a newly released, previously un-aired excerpt from a November NBC interview in which he said, while explaining that he had helped many young people through a charity he founded, that he "didn’t go around seeking out every young person for sexual needs that I’ve helped."

The trial began last week with the testimony of eight men who accuse him of sexually abusing them when they were boys. Over four days, several testified that Sandusky forced them to engage in sexual acts with him in various places, including showers in the Penn State coaches' locker room, hotel rooms and the basement of his home.

Sandusky, who has pleaded not guilty, has admitted showering with boys - some of whom he allegedly met through the charity he created for underprivileged children - but denies the child-sex accusations.

Here is what Sandusky has said publicly in the months before the trial:

Aired portions of NBC interview: I 'horsed around,' but am innocent

On November 14 - days after a graphic 23-page grand jury report detailing some of the allegations was released - Sandusky told NBC's Bob Costas in a phone interview that he was "innocent" of the charges and claimed that the only thing he did wrong was having "showered with those kids."

‚ÄúI say that I am innocent of those charges,‚ÄĚ Sandusky told Costas during the interview, which was aired on NBC's "Rock Center With Brian Williams."

Costas pressed. "Innocent? Completely innocent and falsely accused in every aspect?" Costas said.

Sandusky responded:¬†‚ÄúI could say that I have done some of those things. I have horsed around with kids. I have showered after workouts. I have touched their leg - without intent of sexual contact.‚ÄĚ

Costas also asked: "Are you sexually attracted to underage boys?"

Sandusky repeated the question, paused, and responded, "No. I enjoy young people."

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June 5th, 2012
09:37 AM ET

Jury selection under way in Sandusky trial

Jury selection in the trial of Jerry Sandusky, the former Penn State assistant football coach charged with child rape, began Tuesday in Pennsylvania.

Proceedings started about 35 minutes later because of a conference between Judge John Cleland and attorneys. About 220 potential jurors reported for duty, called to arrive after the court whittled down the number from about 600 based on answers to questionnaires sent to prospective jurors' homes.

A judge last week denied Sandusky's attorneys' latest bid for a delay, allowing the case to move forward.

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Filed under: Jerry Sandusky • Penn State • Pennsylvania
Gotta Watch: Kid feels dizzy, hilarity ensues
Matthew Russell went into the hospital to be treated for a broken arm and left as a YouTube sensation.
May 30th, 2012
06:37 PM ET

Gotta Watch: Kid feels dizzy, hilarity ensues

A few years ago, 7-year-old David DeVore Jr. became a YouTube sensation after his father posted a funny clip of him recovering from a trip to the dentist. The video has been watched more than 100 million times. Now, a newcomer named Matthew Russell is attracting the same type of attention with his post-anesthesia "hilarity." Watch how these kids have become viral video stars.

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Kid on anesthesia: 'I feel dizzaaay'

A child is filmed after receiving anesthesia makes everyone in the hospital room laugh with his reaction to the drug.

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2009: Dad defends loopy kid's vid

"David After Dentist" is a YouTube smash. In 2009, David's dad talked to CNN's Eric Lanford about his son's instant fame.

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Filed under: Florida • Gotta Watch • Health • Pennsylvania • U.S.
Gotta Watch: Bear invades pool, TV news set
Two sisters were shocked to find a bear taking a dip in their family's backyard pool in Monrovia, California.
May 29th, 2012
06:50 PM ET

Gotta Watch: Bear invades pool, TV news set

Bear sightings caught on video!

We expect bears to wander through the wilderness or even parade inside a zoo. See what happens when the "unexpected" happens and a bear is caught wading in a family's pool. We've obtained video of bears crashing a TV news set and bumping into an unexpected man texting on his phone, too.

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Bear takes dip in family's pool

A bear in California decides to "cool off" and take a dip in a family's pool.

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Bears walk on set during newscast

Four bears walked into WNEP's outdoor weather set seconds before the start of a live forecast.

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Texter 'ran for life' when he saw bear

A California man comes face to face with a 400-pound black bear scouring a busy neighborhood in search of food.

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Filed under: Animals • Bears • California • Gotta Watch • Pennsylvania • U.S.
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