November 11th, 2011
07:39 AM ET

Friday's live events

The presidential election may be a year away, but CNN.com Live is not resting on its laurels until then.  We're your home for the latest breaking events on the campaign trail.

Today's programming highlights...

9:00 am ET - New Greek prime minister sworn in - Lucas Papademos is sworn in as embattled Greece's new prime minister in Athens.

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Filed under: Greece • Politics • World
New prime minister named in Greece
Former vice president of the European Central Bank Greek Lucas Papademos has been named Greece's new prime minister.
November 10th, 2011
07:52 AM ET

New prime minister named in Greece

Lucas Papademos, a former banker and European Central Bank vice president, has been named prime minister of Greece, the Greek president's office said Thursday.

Papademos was one of several political leaders meeting with Greek President Karolos Papoulia with the goal of forming a new government.

Prime Minister George Papandreou's office had said he would resign Wednesday, but that move was delayed until Thursday.

In a televised address to the nation, Papandreou said that a government of national unity would do whatever was necessary to bring Greece out of its economic crisis.

The country will be stronger and more secure after it implements a controversial European bailout deal that was agreed to last month, he said.

Greece wants the international community to see that it knows how to be united in the face of difficulty, he added. "A new season is opening," he said, adding that he wished the new government success.

Papandreou met Wednesday night with President Papoulias, but did not offer his resignation.

The prime minister said this week he was optimistic about the formation of a new government amid thorny discussions.

-  CNN's Elinda Labropoulou and Andrew Carey in Athens contributed to this report.

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Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou resigning
November 9th, 2011
11:15 AM ET

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou resigning

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou said in a televised address Wednesday that a government of national unity would do whatever was necessary to bring Greece out of crisis.

Greece wants the international community to see that it knows how to be united in the face of difficulty, he said.

Papandreou is expected to resign shortly, and reportedly was headed to the presidential mansion to tender his resignation to President Karolos Papoulias.

In a phone call earlier Wednesday, Papandreou told French leader Nicolas Sarkozy that the new government would have support from the majority and the opposition, the Elysee Palace said in a statement.

Greek prime minister briefs Sarkozy on coalition talks

The latest updates come a day after the prime minister said he was optimistic about the formation of a new government amid thorny discussions.

Papandreou and the main opposition leader, Antonis Samaras, have been locked in talks on who might lead the new government. Rumored contenders include Lucas Papademos, a former vice president of the European Central Bank and ex-governor of the Bank of Greece, currently a visiting economics professor at Harvard University.

The political turmoil in Greece has shaken international markets, as investors fear a new bailout deal negotiated with European leaders late last month - which has stringent austerity measures attached - may not be implemented.

Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, warned Wednesday of the potential for a "lost decade" if the world's nations do not join forces against the "dark clouds" gathering on the horizon.

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November 6th, 2011
04:33 PM ET

Greece's prime minister to quit in deal to salvage bailout package

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou will step down as his government's leader, the country's president announced Sunday night - agreeing to do so on the condition that the controversial 130 billion euro bailout deal is approved.

The announcement follows a meeting on Sunday in which Papandreou and Antonis Samaras - the leader of the New Democracy party, Greece's leading opposition party - agreed to form a new government.

The two will meet again Monday to discuss who will become the nation's next prime minister as well as who will serve in the new government, according to the statement from President Karolos Papoulias.

No more details or a timeline of future events were disclosed, beyond that new national elections will be held sometime after the bailout is implemented. Earlier Sunday, Samaras told reporters that once Papandreou resigns everything will "take its course" and "everything else is negotiable."

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Filed under: Economy • Greece
November 4th, 2011
07:04 PM ET

Papandreou wins confidence vote

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou won a confidence vote in Parliament early Saturday after days of political turmoil sparked by his controversial proposal to hold a referendum on an international bailout for Greece.

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Obama says he's pleased Greek opposition embraced bailout
November 4th, 2011
11:16 AM ET

Obama says he's pleased Greek opposition embraced bailout

President Barack Obama said Friday he is pleased Greece's opposition party has backed Europe's economic bailout plan for the country.

"The international community is going to stand ready to assist," he said at the G-20 economic summit in Cannes, France.

Obama said recent events in Greece have underscored the importance of implementing a Greek economic bailout plan fully and quickly, adding that "global demand is weakening" and "the world faces challenges that put our economic recovery at risk."

European Union leaders on October 27 got Greek bondholders to scrap about half of Greece's debt as part of a three-pronged plan aimed at shoring up Greece's financial future, returning stability to Europe's banks and expanding the EFSF bailout fund's resources to more than €1 trillion.

But less than a week later, Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou shocked the world by calling for a national referendum on international aid for his country - despite already agreeing in principle to implement reforms in order to meet Greek bondholders' terms - which, if rejected, could lead to a Greek default and the country's exit from the euro.

But on Thursday, Papandreou backed away from the referendum plans, saying the opposition's approval of the bailout made a referendum unnecessary.

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November 4th, 2011
07:35 AM ET

Friday's live events

Watch CNN.com Live for gavel-to-gavel coverage of Dr. Conrad Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial.  Jury deliberations are expected to begin today.

Today's programming highlights...

12:00 pm ET - Greek parliament debates Papandreou's fate - Greece's parliament holds a final day of debate on a confidence motion in Prime Minister George Papandreou's government.  A vote is expected around 7:00 pm ET.

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Greek opposition leader calls for Papandreou to step down
Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou proceeds to a cabinet meeting on Thursday in Athens.
November 3rd, 2011
02:51 PM ET

Greek opposition leader calls for Papandreou to step down

[Updated at 2:46 p.m. ET] The leader of the main Greek opposition party has called for Prime Minister George Papandreou to step down and for snap elections to be held within six weeks.

The move by Antonis Samaras comes amid uncertainty over whether Papandreou was canceling a referendum over a European bailout package. Earlier Thursday, Papandreou told his Cabinet there was not need for a referendum, given opposition support for the tough austerity measures that accompany the bailout.

Samaras' move undermines the idea of consensus on the austerity measures attached to the bailout deal.

European Union leaders on October 27 got Greek bondholders to scrap about half of Greece's debt as part of a three-pronged plan aimed at shoring up Greece's financial future, returning stability to Europe's banks and expanding the EFSF bailout fund's resources to more than €1 trillion.

But less than a week later, Papandreou shocked the world by calling for a national referendum on international aid for his country - despite already agreeing in principle to implement reforms in order to meet Greek bondholders' terms - which, if rejected, could lead to a Greek default and the country's exit from the euro.

Earlier Thursday, Greece's finance minister said the country's future "cannot depend on a referendum." The finance minister, Evangelos Venizelos, said the country had to implement the terms of the deal "now, as soon as possible."

[Initial post, 11:45 a.m. ET] Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou is backing off plans to hold a controversial referendum on an international bailout for his country, he told his Cabinet Thursday, saying there was no need for it given opposition support for the tough austerity measures that accompany it.

Still, it was not immediately clear if that meant he was canceling the referendum.

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November 2nd, 2011
09:31 AM ET

Greek cabinet supports call for referendum

Greece's cabinet voted Wednesday to support Prime Minister George Papandreou's call for a referendum as soon as possible on the latest bailout plan, as Europe's stock markets watched anxiously to see what might happen next.

The vote was unanimous, though some of the ministers expressed criticism prior to casting their votes, CNN affiliate Mega Channel reported.

The cabinet vote came hours before German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and senior figures from the International Monetary Fund and European Union were to meet Wednesday with Greek officials at an emergency meeting in Cannes, France, ahead of the G-20 summit.

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Filed under: Economy • G-20 Summit • Greece
October 20th, 2011
11:23 AM ET

Union member dies in protests in Greece

A union member taking part in anti-austerity protests has been killed, a Greek lawmaker tells the country's parliament as it votes on new austerity measures.

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October 5th, 2011
10:19 AM ET

Marchers shut down central Athens in financial protest

At least 10,000 marchers shut down the center of the Greek capital Wednesday to protest the latest waves of austerity measures announced by the government.

The march accompanied a one-day strike in the public sector that shut down Athens International Airport, government ministries and schools. Hospitals operated on skeleton staffs, and some commuter rail services were closed.

The marchers shouted slogans against the government and the threesome overseeing Greece's $146 billion bailout: the European Central Bank, European Commission and International Monetary Fund.

The protesters were unionized public sector workers, angry at the pay cuts they have suffered which, they say, amount to as much as 40% of take-home pay. The best paid 100,000 public sector workers will lose another 20% of their pay, the finance ministry recently announced.

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A Greek tragedy: How the debt crisis spread like a virus in 'Contagion'
Experts are worried about whether the Greek economy may flatline.
September 19th, 2011
02:08 PM ET

A Greek tragedy: How the debt crisis spread like a virus in 'Contagion'

A look at the plot of the No. 1 film at the box office, “Contagion,” shows a striking thematic resemblance to the debt crisis in Greece.

“’Contagion’ follows the rapid progression of a virus that kills within days. As the epidemic grows, the worldwide medical community races to find a cure and control the panic that spreads faster than the virus itself.” That’s what the film’s website says.

So how exactly does that relate to Greece, you ask?

In a theoretical movie that followed the "Contagion" effect in Greece, the plot would follow the rapid progression of debt that is crippling economies. As the debt drives up interest rates and sends financial markets plunging, the worldwide political and financial communities race to find the public money to stabilize markets and control the financial panic that spreads faster than the debt itself.

More than a year ago, Michael Shuman, writing on Time.com, told how this script played out in the Asian financial crisis of 1997, and how Greece might be the latest sequel.

That is in part because the crisis in Europe has turned into an epidemic of sorts as it spreads from country to country. It's left the European Union struggling and the eurozone's financial health hanging in the balance, and it threatens prospects for a U.S. recovery if the global economy is in shambles. Which is part of the reason that U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner huddled with European finance ministers in search of a way out of the debt crisis.

And it's not just a financial crisis that's spreading. It's the fear too.  In the same way that riots in England have been blamed on economic hardships, reports out of Greece show the once carefree residents are getting "more depressed by the day" with depression and suicide rates growing.

Can an answer be found in time?

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Greeks pass critical budget cuts despite protests
June 29th, 2011
09:39 AM ET

Greeks pass critical budget cuts despite protests

Greek lawmakers Wednesday approved a package of austerity measures demanded by international lenders, despite protests outside Parliament as they were voting, in a move that should clear the way for an emergency loan to Athens.

Greek riot police fired round after round of tear gas to keep small crowds of protesters away from Parliament in the run-up to the vote and as lawmakers one by one said "Yes" or "No."

Angry demonstrators hurled stones at police, chanted, waved Greek flags and set small fires to protest the austerity measures, which include new taxes and job cuts.

Police on motorcycles patrolled in pairs as tensions rose, but both sides showed some restraint, with the majority eyeing each other warily rather than wading into the melee.

Riot police also clashed with stone-throwing demonstrators Tuesday, firing tear gas to disperse protesters during riots that left 21 police officers and one demonstrator injured.

The two-day general strike is continuing on Wednesday, with members of three major unions planning to march on Parliament after the vote.

Protests have been raging in Athens over austerity measures that lawmakers passed Wednesday.
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Wednesday's live video events
President Obama holds a news conference today in Washington
June 29th, 2011
07:51 AM ET

Wednesday's live video events

President Obama speaks to the nation on the issues of the day, while Greece struggles with an economic crisis.  Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage on these developing stories.

Today's programming highlights...

Continuing coverage - Greek austerity debate

9:00 am ET - Casey Anthony trial - Testimony continues in the trial of the Florida woman accused of killing her young daughter.

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Filed under: Casey Anthony • Crime • Economy • Greece • World
Violence in the streets of Athens
A protestor kicks a tear gas canister during clashes with riot police during a 48-hour general strike in Athens.
June 28th, 2011
12:33 PM ET

Violence in the streets of Athens

About 3,000 Greek riot police faced off against demonstrators in Athens as thousands marched to protest proposed austerity measures on the first day of Greece's two-day strike.

Some protesters threw rocks at security forces. One demonstrator and three police officers have been slightly injured, police said. Law enforcement fired tear gas at some demonstrators.

Most of the clashes are outside the Greek Parliament building in the center of the country's capital, where lawmakers are set to vote Wednesday on a tough five-year package of tax increases and spending cuts. European Council President Herman van Rompuy urged them to pass the measures to help ease Greece's serious financial problems.

"There are decisive moments and the coming hours will be decisive, crucial for the Greek people, but also for the Eurozone and the stability of the world economy," he told the European Parliament in Brussels on Tuesday. Read developments in this story and more about how Greece's money woes are affecting its relationship with the EU and economies throughout the world.

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Israel denies fiscal pressure on Greece to block flotilla boats
Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman visiting Greece in January of this year on an official visit.
June 26th, 2011
10:45 AM ET

Israel denies fiscal pressure on Greece to block flotilla boats

The Israeli foreign ministry on Sunday rejected as "ludicrous" suggestions that Israel and the United States were using economic pressure to force fiscally strapped Greece into preventing boats from participating in an international flotilla to the Gaza Strip.

"Do these people have any proof whatsoever to such claims?" asked Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Yigal Palmor. "Their entire activity is aimed at demonizing the state of Israel. What are they saying, that we have used all the Jewish bankers in the world to cancel Greece's bonds? What kind of fantasy world are they living in?"

Organizers of one boat planning to join the flotilla, the U.S.-registered Audacity of Hope, released a statement Sunday asking the Greek government to explain why the leased vessel was being prevented from leaving a Greek port.

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Greek prime minister survives confidence vote
June 21st, 2011
06:34 PM ET

Greek prime minister survives confidence vote

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou's reshuffled Cabinet survived a vote of confidence early Wednesday despite widespread opposition to budget cuts he says are needed to prevent a government default.

International lenders have demanded Greece cut spending, lay off public workers, raise taxes and raise 50 billion euros ($71 billion) through selling off state-owned enterprises in exchange for a bailout of the cash-strapped nation. Vehement protests against the austerity measures spurred Papandreou (pictured) to shake up his government last week, leading to Wednesday's 155-143 vote.

Lawmakers are slated to vote on the privatization plan and further tax increases, pension cuts and layoffs on June 30. European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso told CNN on Tuesday that Greece risks being abandoned by both Europe and the International Monetary Fund if it fails to act.

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On the Radar: Afghanistan, Huntsman, Greece, summer
A U.S. soldier takes up a position near schoolchildren Tuesday in Afghanistan's Khost province.
June 21st, 2011
08:47 AM ET

On the Radar: Afghanistan, Huntsman, Greece, summer

Afghanistan drawdown - President Barack Obama will announce Wednesday how many U.S. troops he'll bring home from Afghanistan when the drawdown begins next month. Obama is expected to announce the approval of a plan that would result in 30,000 U.S. "surge" forces being withdrawn by the end of 2012, an administration official told CNN. There are about 100,000 U.S. troops serving in Afghanistan, including the so-called surge ordered in 2009 in a bid to control violence there.

Huntsman as GOP candidate - Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman is set to announce Tuesday his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination. He's a motorcycle-riding Mormon who speaks fluent Mandarin, a soft-spoken father of seven with eclectic political connections. He was ambassador to China for President Barack Obama, whom he once described as a remarkable leader. That could make the primary season difficult for him.

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Friday's live video events
March 25th, 2011
07:36 AM ET

Friday's live video events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the conflict in Libya and the nuclear crisis in Japan.

Today's programming highlights...

9:00 am ET - Casey Anthony hearing - A third day of hearings into whether certain scientific evidence can be used during the trial of Casey Anthony, the Florida woman accused of killing her young daughter.

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Arizona • Barack Obama • Casey Anthony • Crime • District of Columbia • Earthquake • Florida • Greece • Japan • Labor • Libya • Natural Disasters • New York • Nuclear • On CNN.com today • Politics • Tsunami • U.S. • World
Euro playoff blowout sets records
Montepaschi Siena's Milovan Rakovic, right, tries to drive past Olympiacos' Loukas Mavrokefalidis during their Euroleague playoff game Tuesday night in Piraeus, Greece.
March 23rd, 2011
07:50 AM ET

Euro playoff blowout sets records

While basketball fans in the U.S. are poring over their NCAA tournament brackets, European professional league fans are also enjoying playoff action.

But it may not have been so enjoyable for fans of Italian team Montepaschi Siena, who saw their heroes humiliated Tuesday night in an 89-41 blowout by Olympiacos in a  league quarterfinal game. Olympiacos hails from Piraeus, Greece, where the game was played.

The thrashing set Euroleague playoff records for margin of victory (48 points), fewest points allowed in a half (9), fewest points allowed through three quarters (22), and most rebounds by one team (55), according to the league's website.

Things looked bad from the tipoff for Siena, as Olympiacos took off with a 19-0 start. Montepaschi missed its first 11 shots before Nikos Zisis finally broke the spell with a 3-pointer.

But it was too late. The score just kept getting more ridiculous as the first half wore on: It was 24-4 at the end of the first quarter, 33-4 soon after that, and 47-9 at halftime.

"I have never been beaten that much in my life before," Montepaschi forward Shaun Stonerook said. "This was as bad as it gets. We knew that we were done by halftime and tried to get ready for the next game in the second half."

Game 2 is Thursday night on the same court in Piraeus.

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